Source of stick-type wallplugs



A (new) 3mm masonry drill without hammer action will usually give you a good starter hole in iffy masonry. I only use hammer where necessary.
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I second that. Been forced into the drilling of pilot holes because otherwise I often create an 'orrible bodge which I have to try to fix with filler and/or cement. I do use hammer action still. Did try without and seemed to make little progress perhaps because of drill bit bluntness. But maybe it would be better yet if I just persevered.
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On Saturday, February 7, 2015 at 9:21:55 PM UTC, Windmill wrote:

You get quicker progress, a neater hole & less bit wear if you use hammer action. With sds its even better
NT
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On Saturday, February 7, 2015 at 7:33:03 AM UTC, Windmill wrote:

That would surely be a problem for any plug type. Just ram some wood in there.
NT
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On 02/02/2015 07:10, Windmill wrote:

Not answering the question, but you can stick two plugs into a deep hole and get a similar effect. (e.g. 2x brown plug, and 3 or 4" screw)
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On 04/02/2015 10:52, John Rumm wrote:

If the "plaster" region is dodgy enough, you can end up missing the secure inner plug with the screw. If the screw is holding something with a distributed load (like a piece of batten) the fact that there is little structural strength in the plaster doesn't matter as long as the screw anchors well into the brickwork.
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On 04/02/2015 10:52, John Rumm wrote:

You don't need to do that, you just put the screw in and tap it with a hammer to drive the plug into the brick rather than the plaster/air. Having two plugs one in the brick and one in the soft stuff doesn't make the fixing harder to pull out but it *may* stop you cracking plaster board if its a dry lined wall. I use filler or expanding foam to do that.
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On Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 4:00:07 PM UTC, Dennis@home wrote:

What you say works for hard masonry + knackered plaster. 2 plugs works best where there isnt that contrast, or whre you need a deep strong fix in soft brick.
NT
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On 04/02/2015 15:37, Dennis@home wrote:

This is true when the plaster is soft. However when you need a strong fixing into a sound wall, then two plugs can be worthwhile.

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I find that with the strip type, the part which is in the brick prevents the part which is in the plaster from turning, the part in the plaster gives some side(vertical) load bearing capability even if the hole diameter is a bit too great in the plaster part of the hole, and if the strip fails to be tapped in to the full intended depth for some reason, you can often just cut off the still-protruding part at the surface, assuming that leaves a sufficient amount in the brick where the grip is strongest.
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On 02/02/2015 07:10, Windmill wrote:

I'm in a similar situation here fixing shelves to 35mm insulated plasterboard stuck on a blockwork wall. Decided to go for Rigifix wall anchors <http://buyrigifixonline.co.uk/ - they're a bit pricey at £1 each (though you can get them about 30% cheaper on Ebay) but they really do the the business with a much better grip than frame fixings. There's a Youtube video at <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaYfs3lr1jI

You need to be careful to make sure to drill a neat 12mm hole for them though. If the drill shakes about and makes an oversize hole then the body of the plug just spins round when you try to screw in the metal core.
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On 07/02/15 21:23, Mike Clarke wrote:

That I like ^^
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On 07/02/2015 21:23, Mike Clarke wrote:

If you are going to the trouble of putting holes that big in you may as well get a tube of filler and fill the gap behind the board and redrill after its set.
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On 02/02/2015 07:10, Windmill wrote:

And just for info,
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/171460048318
just received the pack of 5 each x 300 mm in three sizes for £5-99 including postage, good value for those jobs which they do well.
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