Smart Electricity meters - Should I want one

I am probably going to change my electricity supplier (i.e. the people I pay for the supply) to make a small saving.
This has lead me to wonder about smart meters. I would quite like one if it would provide the data for me to end up with an MS excel graph showing how much power I use in each hour of the day. Is this likely to be possible? I don't want to read the meter every hour, I could do that now.
From what I have learnt so far, not all meters are the same, and if you have one and then change supplier, the new supplier may say that the meter is incompatible with their systems.
I should say that as a way of life supplying meter readings once a year and then sorting out the bill is quite good enough for me.
--
Michael Chare

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On Friday 20 September 2013 15:09 Michael Chare wrote in uk.d-i-y:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-22665918
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-22608085
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/04/30/smart_meter_hacking/
Still want one?
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And then there's the function creep on the data gathered, that's bound to come along at some point.
--
fred
it's a ba-na-na . . . .
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Tim Watts wrote:

Once upon a time, back in the 70s, electricity had to be rationed due to supply problems. This was done in the only way possible at the time: rolling power cuts.
These days, like lines of pensioners queueing outside a possibly-collapsing bank, this sort of thing is very bad publicity for the government. They have made it a law to keep the news of possible bank failures secret, so that gets rid of that particular embarrassment.
The next one is when we start to run out of electricity, currently thought to be in 2015, due to the policy of appeasing the greens by closing perfectly viable coal-fired power-stations and replacing them with nothing effective. No-one dare mention the N-word, and anyway it's too late to get them rolling by then.
So, the government needs to deal with this uncomfortable situation yet get itself off the hook. The method? Smart meters!
You pay the £11bn cost, and the electricity companies can now change the price of electricity moment by moment, the near-instantanous readings being sent by the smart meter so there's no escape except to turn things off. So, at no cost to itself, the government can say 'nothing to do with us, sunshine', while pensioners freeze and we all get used to using cooking the evening meal at midnight and using the washing-machine at 3:00am.
Of course, having the smart meters in place beforehand means that they know your usage pattern, so any attempt to fiddle the meter will stand out.
--
Terry Fields


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On 20/09/2013 15:57, Terry Fields wrote:

I think it would be a brave government that would allow the power companies to bring in dynamic pricing to a greater extent than we have it now.
There is a conundrum :I can see that more information about my electricity usage is useful to me, but my enthusiasm for sharing this data with others is somewhat limited.
What I need is my own wired in smart meter.
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Michael Chare

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Michael Chare wrote:

Have a look at the openenergymonitor website. Whole load of guys doing open source energy monitoring predominantly in the uk.
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On 20/09/2013 17:28, Bob Minchin wrote:

Thank you. That is really quite interesting.
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Michael Chare

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On Fri, 20 Sep 2013 16:34:10 +0100, Michael Chare wrote:

There are a number of "energy monitors" out there. Clip a small current transformere aound one of the CU tails that connects to a box, that wirelessly transmits the data to a display unit. Some have logging built in and computer interfaces so you can see your energy useage.
I have a CurrentCost unit, works well and is fairly accurate, less than a unit/day adrift from the real meter. Can have a USB connection to a computer, it squirts realtime data over that every 6 seconds or so. It logs stuff itself and periodicaly sends the historical data as well. This data is in a published XML format so easy to work with.
--
Cheers
Dave.
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On 20/09/2013 17:36, Dave Liquorice wrote:

here is another alternative
http://www.theowl.com/products/owlusb.php
--
Chris

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You have a cite for this nonsense, of course?
--
Today is Prickle-Prickle, the 45th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3179
“A preoccupation with the next world clearly shows an inability to
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Huge wrote:

Wish I did, but that would mean keeping a searchable record of all news items I read, and I don't know anyone that does that.
This describes the approximate equivalent in the US:
"Deposit insurance systems insure each depositor up to a certain amount, so that depositors' savings are protected even if the bank fails. This removes the incentive to withdraw one's deposits simply because others are withdrawing theirs.[1] However, depositors may still be motivated by fears they may lack immediate access to deposits during a bank reorganization.[6] To avoid such fears triggering a run, the U.S. FDIC keeps its takeover operations secret, and re-opens branches under new ownership on the next business day.[21] Government deposit insurance programs can be ineffective if the government itself is perceived to be running short of cash.[20]"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_run
The secrecy to which I referred might not relate to a failing bank per se, but the BoE/government's actions in preventing said bank collapsing. In any case, it stops the queues of wrinkies because they don't know their bank is going under.
Anyone know any different?
--
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On 20/09/2013 15:57 Terry Fields wrote:

Really? Not heard of that one. When did it happen?
--
F




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F wrote:

Since banks started to fall over. It was mentioned in a report a few years ago, but apart from noting the item, I didn't keep a reference, and being unfamiliar with banking regulation terminology, can't advise where it might be found.
It could be argued that since deposits are guaranteed up to a certain level, a run on a bank by wrinklies effectively neither helps them or the bank, hence the regulation. The US has a similar scheme to restrict such publication.
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Terry Fields


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On 21/09/2013 14:46 Terry Fields wrote:

And a derogatory term for someone your age would be?
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F




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F wrote:

Wrinkly.
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Terry Fields


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I don't believe you.
--
Today is Prickle-Prickle, the 45th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3179
“A preoccupation with the next world clearly shows an inability to
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On Saturday 21 September 2013 15:04 Huge wrote in uk.d-i-y:

And it may be "guaranteed" but how long does it take to see your money?
I had some dosh in an icelandic bank and moved it out quick. Glad I did because the bank went bang a few months later.
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wrote:

So it was you responsible for them going bust?
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On 21/09/2013 15:57, Tim Watts wrote:

Same here... I have a friend who had quite a large amount trapped in there for a while - took many months to get it back.
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Cheers,

John.
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On Friday, 20 September 2013 15:17:52 UTC+1, Tim Watts wrote:

It's not hacking that worries me so much as remote-disconnect it the hands of the power company. A little glitch from your bank, or one of those 2-million-quid bills, and they'll be power-mad keen to disconnect you at the press of a button.
(the hackers won't wait for a full roll-out, there'll be a new exploit every few weeks, until the meter supplier wises up - and finally discovers security)
In fact the hackers will create plausible doubt - that bill can't be right.
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