Siting a satellite dish using satellite eclipse with the sun

I posted this to uk.tech.digital-tv but subsequently thought it might be of interest to other potential d-i-y satellite-TV 'ers here too.
Lidl started me off with their inexpensive kit, 79.99 complete with dish, which worked fine. Its weak point is the flimsy dish mounting bracket. The snag setting it up d-i-y was selecting a location for the dish that was not obscured by individual conifer trees, clear line of sight to the satellite being essential.
For anyone uncertain of a suitable location for a satellite dish, possibly because there are tall buildings or trees close by, the sun can provide a useful guide in the next couple of days. (Monday 11 & Tuesday 12)
Twice a year, spring and autumn, the arc of the sun across the sky is practically identical to the arc on which lie the positions of the geostationary communication satellites.
At the time of the eclipse (sun-out) for each satellite, sun and satellite are at the same position in the sky, so anywhere where the sunlight falls will have a clear view of the satellite and tree/building shadows will indicate adverse locations.
The table of sun-out times is found from here: http://www.noctua.demon.co.uk/sunouts/sunouts.html Click the link for your nearest city to get the times for each satellite.
e.g. for Birmingham: http://www.noctua.demon.co.uk/sunouts/birmingham_sunouts.html shows sun-out time for Hotbird as 11:49, Monday 11 th & Tuesday 12 Oct.
It may be useful to take some digital photos of possible locations at the times of eclipse of selected satellites as a record of the positions of tree/building shadows for future reference.
Roger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Isn't it amazing what you can find on the web, although not much help if you are setting up the dish on Wednesday. BobS
--
Tees off to reply.

"Roger" <telstardotsixoneseven0threeatt@claradottnett> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It doesn't move that far. It's only really useful for siting the dish, and approximately aiming. It's hard to get it dead on, and is much easier to use a signal meter for, or even wiggle it to get a picture.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Certainly is. Have you not seen this yet?
http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?How_to_post
--
AJL Electronics (G6FGO) Ltd : Satellite and TV aerial systems
http://www.classicmicrocars.co.uk : http://www.ajlelectronics.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Snip)

This looks really useful, but how does it deal with offset LNBs ?
--
Marcus
To reply use marcus at frenchay dot demon dot co dot uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It dosn't mater what dish/LNB you use.
If you can see the sun at that time of day then from that position you will be able to site a dish there and get that satellite.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As far as I can understand it, if the shadow if the LNB lies exactly at the point where the support arm is attached to the dish, then the whole assembly is pointing straight at the satellite. So if the arm is offset, then this will not occur.
Now if you want the *direction* at which to point the dish, then this happens once a day. The software for this will therefore be much simpler.
--
Marcus
To reply use marcus at frenchay dot demon dot co dot uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Marcus Foreman wrote:

umm, you could cover the dish with aluminimum foil and adjust the dish for the best reflected light hitting the lnb feedhorn.
But of course you'll have to wait for the next solar outage!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Could try http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/AltAz.html
It lets you calculate the Altitude and Azimuth of the sun or moon on any day in any location.
You can use a time where the sun has the correct Altitude to align the dish vertically and then another time to align the dish horizontally.
I have used this site to help setup a satellite in a field in France for a week camping at Le mans.
Andrew

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.