SDS drill sizes

I am digging some fence post holes using an auger and have hit a couple of stones 18 inches down just cant shift them so looking to get a longer SDS chisel off ebay to deal with it. They advertise as 400mm length with a 14mm shank the part that goes into the `chuck` in my sds is is 10 mm. Am I measuring the wrong part, what part is classed as the shank? the main body length or the part that goes into the `chuck?
thanks
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SDS chisel bits have a wider body than the end which goes into the chuck.
It may be that your drill is SDS plus, and the bits are SDS max (larger chuck, for larger bits on more powerful drills). These are not compatible, although you can get an adaptor. Check with the seller it is SDS plus, and not SDS max.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 22:01:30 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

So much for standardisation... :-)
(A bit like those sort of 'coaxial' power connectors on wall-warts)
--
Frank Erskine

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On 26/06/2013 22:46, ss wrote:

Could that be SDS Max (rather than the more common SDS+)?
--
Rod

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On 26/06/2013 23:10, polygonum wrote:

My apologies the ad on ebay is for SDS+ my SDS is also SDS+ Hence my confusion over the `shank` size.
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They've got it wrong, then. 14mm is about right for SDS Max.
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On 27/06/2013 07:15, Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:

Thanks all. I have mailed the guy and will hopefully get a reply.
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On 27/06/2013 12:30, ss wrote:

*I* would have said shank is the "main" bit, not the reduced bit to go in the chuck, so they are demonstrating that it is thick enough not to be too whippy
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On 27/06/2013 22:26, newshound wrote:

I have to say, I rather agree. But OED says specifically the bit by which is is held in the drill. (I would have avoided the word 'bit' in discussing a 'bit' otherwise it can gt a bit confusing.)
Given they also say "cylindrical" I guess they are not up on hex bits, the various flavours of SDS, Hilti, etc.
Definition of shank noun
1 (often shanks) a person’s leg, especially the part from the knee to the ankle:the old man’s thin, bony shanks showed through his trousers the lower part of an animal’s foreleg: many fast animals have long shanks or calves the shank of an animal’s leg as a cut of meat: meals like ham hocks and lamb shanks are cooked with reasonably priced cuts of meat
2the shaft or stem of a tool or implement, in particular: a long, narrow part of a tool connecting the handle to the operational end: gouges vary in the amount of curve or sweep on the cutting edge and the form of the shank the cylindrical part of a bit by which it is held in a drill. the long stem of a key, spoon, anchor, etc.: all Roman lever keys have a tubular shank the straight part of a fish hook.
3a part or appendage by which something is attached to something else, especially a wire loop attached to the back of a button. the band of a ring rather than the setting or gemstone.
4the narrow middle of the sole of a shoe: a rigid leather boot with a full shank
--
Rod

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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 22:46:44 +0100, ss wrote:

One alternative is a large crow bar - generally good for hole digging and shifting stones and stuff.
I don't know how effective an SDS chisel will be against a stone where you describe it - the stone would have to be so well set that the chisel would break it and not just hammer it further into the ground.
If your ground is full of stones then an augur may not be the best tool for digging fence post holes.
I gave up on an augur (a cheap one though) and changed to a long iron bar and a 'two spoons' post hole digging contraption.
Worked much better for me.
Cheers
Dave R
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