Screws sheared off

When I replaced all of our internal doors I used my cordless driver to
insert and tighten the screws on the handles. Now I'm removing the
handles prior to repainting the doors, and using a screwdriver rather
than the cordless to do so, I'm finding some of the screws are shearing
off and leaving just a small stub sticking out of the door.
Anyone got any ideas on how to remove the stubs? Pliers just won't grip
them firmly enough.
TIA
Reply to
F
F wrote:
Perfect job for a mole wrench, which has sprung jaws so it will grip much more firmly than you can with pliers. Available at B&Q, Halfords etc etc
David
Reply to
Lobster
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is it?!! The Amazon pic's so crappy you can't see what's at the business end.
David
Reply to
Lobster
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What is it?!! The Amazon pic's so crappy you can't see what's at the > business end.
It's like a 'wrong way round' drill, gets a purchase on the crappy screw and turns it out, a sort of flatter version of a stud extractor.

Reply to
R D S
I'll give it a try but there's only 3-4mm to get a grip on. Should've tried that first before I tried gripping it hard with the pliers and ending up with an excruciating pain in my hand/wrist!
Reply to
F
=================================== Use a plug cutter and fill the resulting holes with dowels or plugs:
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?id=35920&cm_re=SEARCHPROMO-_-PLUG%20CUTTER-_-35920&ts=51145
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Reply to
Cicero
HI
Something that's worked for me in the past, though it can be a bit of a fiddle, is to grip the stub of the broken screw in the chuck of the cordless screwdriver. Then run the driver in reverse to extract the screw....
Depends how good the chuck is - but can work well
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian
They are, believe me, they are! And they're the cheapo egg carton and embossed hardboard type.
Reply to
F
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Or
These are like stud extractors .. OK if you have the head of screw there and it drills itself into head, gets wedged and extracts the screw. No good when there is no head and only a stub as per post.
I use end nippers, they will usually grip OK ... failing that drill it out, and plug.
Reply to
Rick Hughes
F wrote:
F,
A simple way is to carefully pare away a small amoount of wood from around the top screw shank and then use the corner of a *proper* [1] pair of 'carpenters' pincers to grip the exposed end and turn - do this carefully and it will leave the existing screw hole usable and the handle covers any slight damage.
[1] If possible, get the ones that don't have a bevelled 'cutting' edge as they are far more efficient at gripping in this situation (The seem all but impossible to get these days).
As a matter of interest, pliar and mole grips are almost useless when there is minimal thread showing - along with trying to 'drill' them out as the remains of the screw shank is too thin. But they can be used once you have made a few turns using the pincer method - and will be easier to do so then.
Brian G
Reply to
Brian G
In article ,
I've managed to get one like this out by using a dremel to cut a slot in the top of the stub and then use a big flat blade screwdriver to unscrew it.
Heating the remaining bit of screw up with something (I used a big soldering iron) helped as well.
I've also had success with molegrips (decent ones mind...)
Darren
Reply to
dmc

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