Rusting gatepost - crazy repair idea

This gatepost has some serious rust holes in it - they're not all that easy
to see on this photo but they're about 8cm across:
formatting link

Given the state of the thing and the fact it's in a coastal location I can'
t see it lasting all that much longer but in a bid to put off having to hav
e it replaced I thought about filling it with concrete and even maybe putti
ng in some rods to reinforce the concrete.
What do members of the panel think!?
Reply to
Murmansk
what state are the parts with the actual gate-hangers in?
if they're ok, I's say the concrete idea should work
Reply to
Andy Burns
In message , Murmansk writes
Perfectly sound post:if a little agricultural:-)
Rods and a stiff sand cement mix would do no harm.
Reply to
Tim Lamb
sy to see on this photo but they're about 8cm across:
n't see it lasting all that much longer but in a bid to put off having to h ave it replaced I thought about filling it with concrete and even maybe put ting in some rods to reinforce the concrete.
concrete alone has no tensile strength. With rods it does. It'll all soon r ot out though. Better to weld something on.
NT
Reply to
tabbypurr
Well, seems almost as much work as actually putting in a new one if I might say. I cannot see it obviously, but have seen the effect coastal locations has on metal bits. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa)
Wrap it in duct tape, pour in the strongest cementitious well-flowing gloop you can find or mix, pound in a rod or three, or a bit of old 1/2" pipe, angle iron, whatever, let set. Remove tape if going for a posh repair. I would not omit the rods/pipe/rebar, and check to see that they reach into the ground.
I have done something similar, round post rusted at the bottom. Only I thought the cement might not flow all the way down. So I used expanding foam instead, three 6mm rods, capped the pipe with a cement cone, and eventually painted the lot. This temporary bodge has held up for over 20 years. (However: no salt, little load.)
Thomas Prufer
Reply to
Thomas Prufer
location I
concrete and >> even maybe putting in some rods to reinforce the concrete.
If scaff will fit I think that would be my choice, surounded and filled by a fairly runny sharp snad/cement mix agitated down to get rid of any air pockets . Even better if the scaff can reach a foot, preferably more, below ground level.
But it really depends on how sound the post is near the hinge pins. If that isn't good it'd be better to replace the post. Then a good wire brushing and a couple of coats of hammerite.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
Murmansk was thinking very hard :
You will be struggling to get the concrete to flow down to the bottom. I would suggest not possible at all.
Reply to
Harry Bloomfield
Dry mix?
The base of post looks firm and will resist leaning pressure when a fill goes in. Someone else said they got 20 years out of fix.
Do you want a clean resolution? I ask because I notice the gate and various edges in the background look clean. If so then break it out and put new in.
If time, money, and health are no problem, it's a good project. A nice big 6ft breaker bar will work the upper body well. :-)
Ray.
Reply to
RayL12
The post is just a bit rusty. I can't see any holes.
On the same subject, a significant number of the street signs line speed limits and signage seem to be on the point of falling over (many have) because the mild steel pole was plastic coated, or painted with some sort of plastic paint. all the damage has occurred at or near ground level, from about 18 inches up the post is sound. These were all installed in the 1970s when huge numbers of nice old cast-iron direction and speed limit signs were 'upgraded'.
I could walk around places like Worthing and topple over many speed limit signs by hand
Reply to
Andrew
So add more water to give it more slump. It really won't affect the strength for this purpose. From the Wiki on Concrete: "Modern concrete is usually prepared as a viscous fluid, so that it may be poured into forms, which are containers erected in the field to give the concrete its desired shape."
Reply to
Jeff Layman

Hmm, and I thought I saw a huge hole and thinning shell. I now see I'm mistaken. So, I'm amending my previous advice and agree with another on here who said, clean it up, coat it and then a good lick of paint.
Ray.
Reply to
RayL12
I think you *did* see (several) holes, the O/P said they're there, the black areas look like holes to me ...
Reply to
Andy Burns
They aren't easy to see, true. Bearing in mind the thing is upright, why not just de-rust what's there, and paint it again and job done? It would look nice, too.
Reply to
Chris Bacon
OP here
Thanks for those contributions
All in all I think I'll give it a go as it's got a fair bit of strength in it currently and the hinge attachment points are OK.
If anyone wants to see it this is a link to an edited version of the photo with the contrast adjusted so you can see the holes
formatting link
Reply to
Murmansk
The deep black areas look like holes to me as well. The black paint is weathered/algae streaked. One hole at ground level, some weathered paint, and few more holes.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice

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