Routing for weatherstripping on window frames

I am looking for some insight into routing a channel 8mm wide X 3mm on some window frames to accept weather stripping (carrier & brush). It would seem that I have 2 options for creating the channel:
(1) Route along the edge of the window using a straight bit.
(2) Route along the face of the window using a slot bit (i.e. cuts 90- degrees off from the plane of the bit axis)
What do folks usually do? My inclination is to take option 2, but I am having problems finding a 8mm slot bit. Am I just not looking in the right places (screwfix, axminster, etc.)? Or am I thinking about this the wrong way?
Thanks in advance
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flynnr2 wrote:

What sort of windows? Sliding sashes? Consider where the body of the router will be. You'll be lucky if there aren't obstructions preventing you from doing the whole cut with either method.
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Sorry - I should have been more clear. The windows (sash & casement) will be out of the frames for this operation, so there should be nothing to obstruct the router.
So my question still stands: straight bit or slot bit?
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? http://www.infinitytools.co.uk/shop/3/index.htm
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Hi,
I'd use a 5/16" (just under 8mm) straight bit, especially if the router isn't that powerful as a 8mm slot cutter would need much more torque at a lower speed.
It would also allow cutting easily in several passes using the depth turret if the router has one.
I'd also make sure the slots are very well treated with wood preserver then given a coat of paint or stain, as it could be an ideal place for damp to accumulate and rot to start (especially as no draught thorough the window to dry it out).
For sliding sashes there are sprung brass draught excluders around but I've no idea how good they are.
cheers, Pete.
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Have you seen these for sale in the UK? I used plastic folded V seals on my sliding sashes and they worked well but that have worn out. I'd like to try metal folded seals if I could find them but am also looking at new baton rods with built in pile seals from: http://www.reddiseals.com/acatalog/sash_windows.html
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Actually it's bronze strip though sometimes called copper strip or 'atomic strip' :)
Try Ebay or Google:
<http://search.ebay.co.uk/search/search.dll?&satitle=copper+strip <http://search.ebay.co.uk/search/search.dll?atomic+strip
Also try a local hardware shop, my local one has it though I can't remember the brand.
To me brush draught excluders on sash windows just don't 'look right'...
cheers, Pete.
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I've googled many times and never found a true UK supplier. It's bronze folded V seals I'd like to try which are v rare and I'd prefer not to ship far just to try on one window. The ones you point to on eBay are the more common kinked strip which I don't think do such a good job. I'd also prefer not to deal with the eBay machine.

I know what you mean but hopefully the brushes will not be visible on the ones I linked to, they're sealed on the inner rubbing faces of the batton rod and parting bead.
I had new DG sliding sash windows made up for a 5 sided bay and they had excellent heavy duty spring plastic seals which I can source but they require a lot of machining to fit.
Thanks,
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I'd give this company a try:
<http://www.pemko.co.uk/
The relevant part numbers look to be B72/B73/B74/B75 though they may not do them in the UK.

I'd attempt folding a kinked strip using something like pizza cutter and guide/grooved plank to get it past 90 then some sort of roller to fold it flattish.
cheers, Pete.
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Excellent, just the profile I'm looking for, I'll see if they do them in the UK but they look so good I would import.

The benefit I see in the V is longevity and improved sealing, the nails can be supplemented by double sided sticky so it should be a perfect back side seal. Plus I've got to have a solution I know will work before I dismantle.
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For narrow channels I often prefer to use my biscuit jointer (e.g. rubber weatherstrip with a narrow barbed retainer flange) Even if I have to do two passes to get the width right, it give a straighter groove than routing with a narrow cutter.
Fow a wide, shallow channel like this though, I'd go with an 8mm diameter cylindrical cutter.
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