Roofs



Somneone on Grand Designs has used these, also.
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On Wed, 31 Dec 2008 10:32:58 +0000, a certain chimpanzee, TheOldFellow

Like http://www.tek.kingspan.com/uk/index.htm you mean?
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On Thu, 01 Jan 2009 11:50:52 +0000 abuse@localhost wrote:

Yes! I didn't know about those. Thanks.
R.
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It is possible. Most American houses have roofs constructed this way. They last about 10 years.
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And many American homes have that superb benefit - A basement! Somewhere for the C/H Boiler - somewhere for hobbies and storage. I would love one. I think our dirty damp cellars of the Victorian era put us off cellars. They could work well with decent materials and design.
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what's the difference between a cellar and a basement?
The cellar here has lime mortar walls so damp can seep in even when I've filled in the holes...
How can it be improved?

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I don't think you will fix it - but for a new build it should be possible to properly 'tank' it and have proper ventilation (for the boiler). Perhaps having it only three quarters below ground also helps.
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Think a cellar is only for storage - coal, wine, etc. A basement is habitable. Hopefully.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Cellar is completely below ground level
Basement only partially below ground level -- would expect to have windows above ground level.
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Me too.

W-e-e-e-e-e-e-lll. They do get a fair number of problems with damp.
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 23:17:14 +0000, D.M. Procida wrote:

I'd guess almost certainly maintenance and upkeep. A tiled roof will sit there for decades with little or no maintenance requirement.
My last house had a felted roof on stramit board. Built in the late 60s, and the stramit was showing signs of water ingress at the apex and around the chimney. We moved coz I didn't want the expense of putting on a new roof.
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Surely moving is far more expensive than a new roof - unless you wanted to move anyway?
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On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 23:17:14 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@apple-juice.co.uk (D.M. Procida) wrote:

Looking at American DIY programs on TV I saw quite a few houses being built using boards for the roof and 'shingles' to cover them. The shingles taking the place of tiles or slates. The system seems to work okay but I did wonder about longevity. As others have remarked the slate or tile roof can last hundreds of years with only little maintenance. My own home is well over a hundred years old and apart from a few loose slates after a storm last year has had little attention. I can't see a wooden roof lasting more than a few years at most without needing repair.
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Alang wrote:

Cedar is good on a south facing gable for about 80 years, but abut 60% of that on a north facing gable.
The worst roof is felt, then thatch, then shingle, then corrugated iron, then tiles then slates, then lead/copper, as far as I am aware, longevity wise.
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wrote:

Yes. I've heard of roofs being covered in overlapping wooden splits. Just didn't know what wood. I've seen oak last untreated over a century on the south face of a building but that would be an expensive option

There are tiles made from resin and powder to mimic slates. Much lighter though and as yet no knowledge of their useful life. Our local buiding control office has warned against using them in some circumstances. Can't recall what they were though.
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I've got an artificial slate roof here - it's very popular in London. It's about 20 years old and seems to be holding up pretty well. I dunno where they'd not be suitable as a replacement (unless a listed building etc) - they're pretty strong.
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On Wed, 31 Dec 2008 18:22:46 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

Something to do with the load bearing properties of the roof timbers as I recall. You need to get permission to change them anyway according to the leaflet in the library
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They're lighter than slate - and much lighter than concrete or clay tiles. The problem used to be where people used cheaper concrete tiles to replace slate - the roof structure sometimes couldn't take the extra weight.
Of course if the original was, say, clay tiles, you may well need permission to change the look by going to imitation slate or whatever - perhaps in a conservation area.
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20-25 years if your lucky.
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Appin wrote:

No, it's better than that.
Cedar is somewhat anti-fungal, and rooves don't normally stay consistently wet.
I coudnt fine out how long my shingle roof had been up before I ripped thehouse down, but it was for sure longer than that.
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