Repairing timber shed uprights - fish plates?

I have a large shed with 6" x 3" timber uprights resting on a stub block wall. The bottom 2-3 feet of the posts is rotten so I want to splice-in some new timber. I can't think how to cut a decent lap joint in the bottom end of the remaining upright so I'm tempted to butt join the timber and add steel plates (fish plates?) on each side - at a guess these would be around 150 wide 450 long and a few mm thick.
Suggestions welcomed for how to cut a lap joint on the bottom of a bit of timber that's waggling in the breeze, or for a source of suitable steel plates.
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On 24/07/2018 15:15, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

A bit fiddly, but can't you make the basic cuts for a lap joint with a circular saw? And square off with a panel saw. Then put coach bolts through it.
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On 24/07/2018 16:08, newshound wrote:

Tough to do with the timber hanging down from the roof structure, which it will be once I saw off the rotten bit. I suppose I could cut a sort of half lap joint (zillions of half-depth cuts with a circ saw, then cleaned-up with a chisel) while the rotten bit is still attached and providing a little bit of anchorage, then saw off the end. Hmm, perhaps I could first attach some sacrificial timber over the rot and fix it to the wall to a provide temporary anchorage.
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On 24/07/2018 16:42, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

I was assuming you have a circ saw with a 3 inch cut, that lets you cut a lap either 6 inches wide and 1.5 inches deep, or 3 inches wide and 3 inches deep although I would do the longitudinal cut from both sides in each case. The devil is in the detail of access and how much support remains from the rotten bit. As you say, temporary supports are another option.
The alternative butt joint that you describe will not be very strong in bending. If one (or two) sides of the shed are supported against a wall then this could provide bracing against wind loads so that the uprights are just in compression.
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On 24/07/2018 17:14, newshound wrote:

The circ saw might not manage 3" depth but I was talking about using 1.5" cross cuts (like a narrow dado cutter) to create a half housing and avoid having to try to cut vertically up a waggling piece of wood with a hand saw.

It's not the preferred solution, but should be OK if I can find long galvanized plates to sandwich the joint.
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On 24/07/2018 18:57, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Understood, that would work and not be too slow. The little slices of wood left behind should snap off near the base, leaving not too much cleaning up to do with a chisel. You could also clean up with a sanding disk in an angle grinder.

How visible is it going to be? Another option might be to run a length of dexion up each corner. Maybe 15 inches long, held in place with suitable coach screws. Does it really have to be galvanized?
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On 24/07/2018 16:42, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Sounds like a job for a multitool.
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On 24/07/2018 17:20, dennis@home wrote:

A bit slow, on 6 x 3.
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On 24/07/2018 17:26, newshound wrote:

also getting the 3" depth of cut could be tricky - you would have to plunge from both sides.
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On 24/07/2018 23:28, John Rumm wrote:

To make a lap joint you can take a quarter out first and then take the next quarter out. Assuming you have access to one corner and most of one 6" face. Its easy with a multitool if a bit slow. You need less access than with a circular saw or a hand saw.
Maybe one of those little chain saws in the other thread would do it better?
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On 24/07/18 16:42, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Dont even startt. Do waht I did. Enormous tub of car body filler moulded to upright shape...use bit of timeber to bulk it if you must.
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On 24/07/2018 17:29, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Thanks, but I'd like some strength in the post, rather than just having it look OK
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On 24/07/18 18:58, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Oh FFS its STRONGER than wood!
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On 24/07/2018 22:19, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

It's not the strength of the material that counts, it is the strength of the connections. I agree, you could mould it round some studding let into the wood.
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The other way of course is to get some of thus Arris rail extender brackets, cut the wing bits off and use the angled piece on the timber join. Brian
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writes

Bit of care with a decent handsaw? 3" with a jigsaw is tricky.
I would strengthen by screwing on some 25x50mm folded galvanised steel (because I have some:-) but 1"x2" angle would do. Use two lengths per join.
Alternatively the agricultural approach... butt join and then strengthen by nailing on 3"x2" either side:-)
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Tim Lamb

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On 24/07/2018 18:22, Tim Lamb wrote:

Trying to do this with a jigsaw would be more than tricky - a waste of time!

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writes

Makes more sense to replace it entirely and use an acrow prop to keep the roof up while replacing it.
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On 24/07/2018 20:48, Rod Speed wrote:

Fair point, provided there is not too much disruption or other carpentry required. Devil in the details, as ever.
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Yeah, I guess the external cladding could well be nailed to it and it might well be quite a bit of effort to get that off and back on the new one.
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