Recommended screws for skew-nailing deck boards?

I am currently planning the construction of a deck and have opted to use th e Simpson DBT1Z 'hidden' deck board tie to affix the boards:
http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/dbtz.asp
As you can see from the following graphic these require nailing in to the e dge of a board (for which galvanised nails are provided) and then butting u p and under the previously affixed board, the latter requiring its free edg e skew-nailing into position:
http://www.strongtie.com/graphics/products/large/166c-2009.gif
I can't help but feel that using screws instead of nails might be worthwhil e for the skew-nailing to at least give me the option of being able to pull the boards up at a later date. Why I'd want to do this I don't know, but i f one thing's for certain a reason would present itself if I was to irrever sibly fasten the boards down!
So, I'm wondering if anyone can make a recommendation as to what screw size /type to use? I am mindful of the outdoor aspect, wanting to minimise split ting (the boards are 33mm thick by the way), ease of installation (pilot ho le required?), not wanting the head to be (too) proud and visible through t he 3mm gap etc.
The range on offer at the likes of Screwfix is bewildering to be honest and whilst I've been using their Goldscrews for years for indoor projects I'm wondering if there's something more suitable for this particular job.
Mathew
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On 12/05/2013 18:50, Mathew Newton wrote:

of a board (for which galvanised nails are provided) and then butting up and under the previously affixed board, the latter requiring its free edge skew-nailing into position:

for the skew-nailing to at least give me the option of being able to pull the boards up at a later date. Why I'd want to do this I don't know, but if one thing's for certain a reason would present itself if I was to irreversibly fasten the boards down!

size/type to use? I am mindful of the outdoor aspect, wanting to minimise splitting (the boards are 33mm thick by the way), ease of installation (pilot hole required?), not wanting the head to be (too) proud and visible through the 3mm gap etc.

whilst I've been using their Goldscrews for years for indoor projects I'm wondering if there's something more suitable for this particular job.

I wouldn't use those clips, personally, I would just use decking screws from the top straight into the joists. Proper coated screws won't stain significantly, and it is bollocks about clips saving you countersinking, you won't need to with a decent cordless drill.
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On 12/05/2013 19:42, newshound wrote:

+1
I use either Toolsatan or SF deck screws depending on what's cheaper at the time.
http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Screws+Fixings/Decking+Roofing+Screws/Decking+Screw+Tub+45mm+x+60mm/d90/sd2856/p89425
http://www.screwfix.com/p/timbadeck-countersunk-carbon-steel-decking-screws-4-5-x-65mm-pack-of-1300/54853
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On Sunday, 12 May 2013 20:13:42 UTC+1, The Medway Handyman wrote:

Okay, 2 out of 2 suggestions for not using the clips has swayed me. As you can probably gather there was something wanting me to be steered towards conventional screwing as the clips could well have come back to haunt me.
I've used 'Deck-Tite Composite' screws before (when Screwfix used to sell them) and found they performed well and quite a subtle head on them too:
http://www.newtonnet.co.uk/house/20060815/slides/IMG_4922.jpg
http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/612618.pdf
Granted that was on a groove-side-up deck but hopefully they'll be just as good against a smooth surface.
Mathew
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On 12/05/2013 22:37, Mathew Newton wrote:

probably gather there was something wanting me to be steered towards conventional screwing as the clips could well have come back to haunt me.

I think I would go for a "conventional" bugle headed one on a flat board as it will pull in and create its own countersink, leaving a flush surface
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On Sunday, 12 May 2013 19:42:23 UTC+1, newshound wrote:

I was going down that route because I've opted to have the boards smooth si de up and so figured for aesthetic reasons a screwless finished would be pr eferable...
I must say though, I'm already making extra work for myself by virtue of th e fact I've also chosen to lay the boards diagonally (I never do things by half, but the extra effort usually pays off!) and so simply screwing them d own would obviously be much easier.
Perhaps with the right choice of deck screw the visible heads would still b e neat though...?
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On 12/05/2013 20:16, Mathew Newton wrote:

up and so figured for aesthetic reasons a screwless finished would be preferable...

fact I've also chosen to lay the boards diagonally (I never do things by half, but the extra effort usually pays off!) and so simply screwing them down would obviously be much easier.

The only ones I have used have been grooved one side, rippled the other. I still think I would go for screws because it's not difficult to set them just fractionally below the wood surface with a good screwdriver.
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On 12/05/2013 21:38, newshound wrote:

Why just fractionally below the surface? When I did some decking, I screwed the screws so the heads were well below the surface, with the object that nobody could hurt themselves on a screw if it worked itself slightly loose. That was around 10 years ago, and it's all holding together perfectly fine.
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On 12/05/2013 22:14, GB wrote:

Because if you go in deep it becomes a place for dirt to settle, and may tear the wood leaving splinters at the edge of the hole. I wouldn't expect a decking screw to work itself loose, but if it did I would just tweak it down a bit tighter. But in truth I don't think it matters all that much, it's just that the OP seemed particularly concerned about neat appearance.
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Mathew Newton wrote:

Mathew,
I'm not a fan of decking and I wonder just how slippery 'smooth face' up would become in wet or icy weather - or even from liquid spills?
The reason for the question is that a close relative slipped on a friends rather wet, 'standard grooved-side up' decking some time ago seriously injuring.himself.
Cash
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On 13/05/2013 10:33 a.m., Cash wrote:

+1 Potentially quite dangerous
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On 13/05/2013 02:42, Gib Bogle wrote:

Nope.
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On 12/05/2013 23:33, Cash wrote:

Almost all decks in the USA, Canada & Australia are smooth face. Why should it be any different to a wooden floor with a liquid spill?

The 'standard grooved-side up' decking was upside down. The grooves are anti cupping grooves, not anti slip grooves - if anything they make a deck more slippery.
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Interesting. That hadn't occurred to me. Makes the boards easier to stack rather than having any benefit for the user I imagine
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On 13/05/2013 09:55, stuart noble wrote:

My belief is that 'product managers' or 'marketing executives' in the DIY chains looked at deck boards from the USA & made an incorrect assumption that the grooves were anti slip.
Once the mistake was made it carried on & became accepted as the norm.
Take a look at the Home Depot site - not a groove to be seen. It the highly litigious USA.
http://www.homedepot.com/Lumber-Composites/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbqpg/Ntk-All/Ntt-decking%2Bboards/h_d2/Navigation?Ntx=mode+matchall&catalogId053&Nu=P_PARENT_ID&langId=-1&storeId051&primarySearchOnly=true&omni=c_Lumber & Composites&searchNav=true
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On Sunday, May 12, 2013 11:33:50 PM UTC+1, Cash wrote:

If anything, smooth side up will present a less slippery surface because di rt/algae buildup will be much reduced.
The Timber Decking Association (I bet they've had a 'guest publication' fea tured on Have I Got News For You!) say there is no evidence to suggest that groove side up provides any grippier a surface. If anything, grooving appe ars to be somewhat unique to the UK by all accounts.
It's a fair point about wood being potentially slippy in general though whe n wet (and dirty), however this deck will be at the bottom of the garden an d only used in fair weather so it's not like it will be at an entry/exit us ed all year round.
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On 13/05/2013 09:07, Mathew Newton wrote:

Plus you have a greater contact area between sole & deck.

I have a lot of decking books, all American or Canadian. Most pictures show smooth side up, groove side down.
Good quality oak floorboards have similar anti cupping grooves on the underside - you wouldn't lay those that side up.

The sealing of a deck with a decking oil leaves an extra non slip component.
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Mathew Newton wrote:

Thanks for the reply Mathew, but in my long experience of timberwork, I am still rather dubious about walking/socialising on any planed timber surface that hasn't been given some sort of very good anti-slip treatment.
As an aside, that's the only 'major' job I've ever refused to do for SWMBO in some 50 years - putting down around 60 odd square yards of wooden decking covering part of the rear garden just to impress the other 'grannies' when they call around. And boy, did I have sore ears for a few weeks. <vbg>
Good luck with the project though.
Cash
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On 13/05/2013 22:44, Cash wrote:

I've built around 50 decks in the last 6 years, never heard of a slip on any of them.
The boards I use are similar to these (shown upside down). Note; they also supply smooth deck boards.
http://www.qualitydecking.co.uk/product_details2.php?product=4
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