reccomendations for budget chainsaw for firewood chopping?

wrote:

;-)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snedding
It can also be a sport apparently:

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=QeGWIWuazwQ&feature=user

T i m
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Hi, I would stay with the reciprocating saw..perhaps improve shock by wrapping the handle with shock absorbing material and buying a decent set of gloves with shock absorbing properties. Perhaps a coarser saw blade for speed ? I think a chain saw for this purpose would be a big headache. Having said this, I have been using an old electric chain saw and have been amazed at how good it is for this type of thing. Perhaps divide the wood up and be sure and use the recip saw where there is a greater chance of nails and an electric chain saw on the cleaner bits. Good luck. David
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Adam Lipscombe wrote:

I've just cut up 10 cubic metres of logs for my log burner, and wouldn't recommend a chain saw at all. I've a large circular saw mounted with the blade vertical in a frame, with a hinged cradle in front of it. Lay the log in the cradle, force the cradle against the saw blade using your thigh, holding the log in place with both hands, the blade rotates downwards at the front pushing the log into the cradle, the offcut then falls clear of the cradle. The entire setup, knocked up by a local blacksmith, cost less than a /decent/ chainsaw and is *much* safer. Use a chainsaw and after a few cubic metres you *will* get cocky and overconfident, and that's when accidents happen.
--
Keith

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Keith wrote:

Well how do you get power to your contraption 100 meters down the garden?
The key with anything, from a car, to a chainsaw, is not to get cocky.
When I were a lad. my dad, and ex RAF pilot, taught me cockpit drill.
When I were a cocky lad, I used to get in the car, and think: 'This is a lethal weapon, to me and to everyone else: Now stop, compose yourself, and try to stay alive and not kill anyone'
It's more or less automatic these days, but I still feel the same way about the chainsaw.
My mistake is not feeling the same about the router and the splitting mauls, both of which nearly did serious damage.
To be honest, attitude is far more important than safety gear IMHO. The gear will prevent a bad accident from being a lethal one,or a small accident from being a serious one, but its the discipline and concentration and attention to safety that results in no accidents at all.
Like the poster was saying. If the saw isn't in the cut, its on the brake. Till its automatic.
or when driving..where will I crash this car, if a crash is inevitable (like two people collide ahead of you)
Its amazing how many filed and soft hedges there are, not to mention verges.
Te only time I get really scared, is boxed in motorway driving, where the instinct is to open the gaps to such an extent it encourages someone to fill them. Or in towns, where all the soft options are mortal ;-)
Fortunately thats usually a matter of simply keeping the speed at the limit. then the crash wont be fatal between you and the other car, so avoiding action isn't necessary.
Safety, like total quality, is more a state of mind and an approach, than it is a matter of the gear.
You wouldn't walk around with a loaded gun with the safety catch off, would you?
Its the same with a chainsaw. When not actually about to use, brake on. When moving around, motor off. Unload that chainsaw!
Thats why a good starting one is preferred. The ones that wont start 'half warm' are utter pains. The temptation is to leave it running, on the ground somewhere, while you move the cut logs..
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Hi
Many thanks to all contributors - I have decided that a chainsaw is not the way to go - by the time I have bought a decent saw and safety kit it wont make much sense.
Has anyone used an DeWalt Alligator or Bosch Tyrannosaw? Are these viable alternatives to a chain saw for cutting up scrap wood? Are they more useful that a standard recip saw?
Thanks - Adam
Adam Lipscombe wrote:

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