Re: uPVC worries

Its not right in my opinion - there is no reason why you should accept a crack. Insist they change it.

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IMHO, the frame should be perfectly level and square after installation and sealing.

I installed a Screwfix UPVC window and patio doors, and the instructions were very explicit about not warping anything. I packed and fixed them solidly at the correct intervals before using any foam - and that sparingly.
I'm sure practice makes perfect, but it took me quite some time to get things right.
Two years on, both are working great.
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I`d be concerned too - Shouldn`t upvc double glazed frames generally have strengthening rods inside them, so there shouldn`t have been any movement anyway ?
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On Wed, 11 Aug 2004 23:39:49 +0100, Colin Wilson wrote:

They do but thats more to stop them bending under their own weight. uPVC is very flexable.
As to the OPs problem. The frame should not be distorted at all, units should fit easyly. Any stress on a unit is highly likely to make the unit fail early. Get 'em back to fix it properly. Not quite sure if the crack at the top is in the beading or the frame itself. Niether is good, the latter really bad and needs to sorted out. I don't think you can repair cracked uPVC, at least not by methods available to a DG installer. I suspect a cracked frame means it's time for a new frame. Prepare for extended discussions.
Who did the work? A sub-contractor to a national chain(*) or regional firm or a small local company? Start with a telephoned complaint, follow it up in writing and start keeping copies and records of everything. Try and get the boss man involved, with one of the nationals that'll be the local franchise holder, the national head office won't be very interested in my experience.
(*) It can be difficult to tell if you have subbies or real staff as subbies may well be provided with a uniform and logo'd van etc.
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As you say "Just had a bad dream of a day with window fitters" is it really worth losing sleep over...? -- troubleinstore http://www.tuppencechange.co.uk Personal mail can be sent via website. Email address in posting is ficticious and is intended as spam trap
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Antony wrote:

Well, you are right, of course you should. The glass won't flex to go in the frame, and it should be an *easy* fit, supported *gently* all around. I can't see why the fitter thought that bending the top up would help in any way, the corners still dictate the fit. The frame needs to come out, be properly re- fitted (replaced if cracked), and if the DG unit has been forced into the frame already, that too should be replaced, as it may well have been damaged (the glass will not flex along its length, but the *seals* may have been affected by one side of the unit moving relative to the other.
Make sure that any guarantee you have will cover your bay window for replacement panes and fitting if they insist on re-using the DG unit. Requesting a special additional note on it might give useful leverage in getting a new pane fitted.
Make sure that the fitting is done properly so that support of whatever is above the windows is OK - many, many installations I've seen suffer from sag and cracking to the brickwork/render above the window.
J.B.
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On 11 Aug 2004 14:13:19 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@rbi.co.uk (Antony) wrote:
When it came to the point of putting in the

I'm no DG fitter (nor would want to be) but did help my mate fit 8 uPVC frames (including two dormers and one 45 deg bay) and *none* were bent, bowed, out of plumb etc.
Why, because we took the time to do the right 'prep' (running the angle grinder / bolster over high spots, playing with loads of different shims, removing the frame several times till we got it right etc), time most 'fitters' don't have or won't offer (low margins etc).
There is no reason why your DG bay frame should be 'bent / bowed' in any direction .. I just hope you haven't made your final payment yet?
Yes, you could just leave it as is and turn your back on it but why should you? If you had you car repaired and the boot lid was sticking up at a funny angle you would take it back and get them to sort it wouldn't you?
All the best ..
T i m
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