Pumping rainwater....

On 03/06/2018 22:11, Stephen wrote:

If you retain your existing ball valve you could use this. https://www.midlandchandlers.co.uk/store/category/midland%20chandlers/water%20and%20gas/pumps/pressure%20pumps.aspx
You would also need some form of float switch in your collection tanks to make sure it doesn't run dry. These sort of pumps self prime (up to a point) so can be placed remote from the outside tanks. However, they are noisy and require a hefty 12V supply.
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Fredxx has brought this to us :

Those are intended for caravans and boats. We are away in the tourer caravan at the moment and it uses a pressure switch and small submersible pump outside in the barrel to pump, with a none return valve to hold the pressure/ stop it draining back down. The pressure switch is adjustable for the operating pressure. One thing which concerned me was that the pump is near silent in operation - so if the water ran out, no pressure meant it would just run continuously. At least until someone noticed. I added a piezo sounder, so everytime the pump ran, the piezo sounded. Annoying, but no chance of it running with no water. Another way would be a timer circuit, to limit the run time to a sensible value..
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Harry Bloomfield wrote:

I also fitted a sounder - the smallest I could find, and muffled slightly too.
At a price, you can now get more intelligent pump controllers:
<https://www.whalepumps.com/rv/product.aspx?Category_ID 005&Product_ID1&FriendlyID=A-NEW-INNOVATION-Watermaster-IC-Pump-Controller>
Chris
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On 03/06/2018 22:11, Stephen wrote:

Be sure to put a mesh filter over the intake or you will end up with mosquito larvae everywhere. They jammed my drip feeders in the first iteration of my greenhouse watering system from a large rainwater sump.
Depends how much water it will need to pump and for how long.
I got a fairly powerful 12v thing intended for a pond fountain second hand and altered it to do what I needed which was a short burst of high pressure irrigation morning and evening. Koi pond pumps also do it.
Submersible pumps are using the water they pump to asist with cooling. Make sure you design it so that it fails safe. Pump switches off if no water to pump and overflow can cope with anything the pump can deliver.
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On 04/06/2018 17:30, Martin Brown wrote:

I use IBCs to harvest rainwater off a stable roof to supply water manually to the horses. I don't have a problem with larvae, but I *do* use the floating "chlorine dosing" thingies what you can use in garden pools to suppress the level of algae.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Intex-29040-N-dosing-Dispenser-Pool-Chlorine-Floating-device-for/132462051315?epid 012032523&hash=item1ed75a7ff3:g:C88AAOSwstJZXg3H
I assume that this is what deals with the larvae too.
At another livery yard where I ride, they have a large open water container of a couple of thousand litres which is fed either from towns mains or from a local bore hole (not sure which). They keep a handfull of goldfish in this, which deals very effectively indeed with the larvae (although it does get fairly "green").
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On 04/06/2018 17:30, Martin Brown wrote:

Thank you for that, that is worth knowing.
How small does the mesh size have to be to prevent mosquitoe larvae from entering?
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On 04/06/2018 21:20, Stephen wrote:

An old pair of tights stretched over a wire frame did the trick. Obviously you want to filter over a reasonably large area. Small goldfish in the raintank seemed to keep the filter clean without damaging it.
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On 03/06/18 22:11, Stephen wrote:

SOT...
As everyone expects that just about all taps are connected to a potable mains water supply, I would suggest a clear notice on the external tap: "Rainwater - not for drinking".
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Jeff

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On 04/06/2018 19:16, Jeff Layman wrote:

I would not expect every tap to supply potable water. The law only requires that there is one tap connected to the mains. In a domestic premises that should be the cold tap over the kitchen sink. All others should be treated as likely to be fed from a cistern, unless you definitely know to the contrary.
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On Mon, 4 Jun 2018 19:46:13 +0100, Nightjar wrote:

potable

tap:

Until a few years ago *none* of the taps here where on the mains, the mains only went to 3 x 50 gallon storeage tanks in one loft. A few years ago some of the hot taps went onto the mains. A couple of months ago some of the cold joined them.
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On 04/06/18 19:46, Nightjar wrote:

Yes, but the original source of the water in the cold-water tank would have been treated mains water. I know all sorts of horrors can be found in loft tanks which aren't covered (many years ago I lived in a block of flats where pigeon feathers suddenly appeared in the tap water!), but most people don't know they should really not use bathroom basin tap water for cleaning their teeth, or they ignore it. Rainwater would have far more nasties than anything from a loft.
In any case, I have never seen an outside tap which ran from anything other than mains water, as the pressure from a local tank would be too low for most hoses.
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Jeff Layman wrote:

Isn't it more the case that the bathroom basin tap should be fed from the rising main?
Chris
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On 05/06/2018 08:20, Chris J Dixon wrote:

It is only required that one tap be connected to the mains, which should normally be in the kitchen. Connecting the bathroom basin tap to the mains is recommended, but not required.
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Out predecessors in this house fitted an outside tap to the tank water !!!
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from KT24 in Surrey, England
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On 05/06/2018 07:51, Jeff Layman wrote:

It ceases to be potable water as soon as it is stored.

My business is supplying screens for overflow pipes, to prevent the less obvious problem of insects flying up them and carrying infection into the water supply. That is an important vector in the spread of Legionnaires disease, for example.

That depends very much upon how it has been handled. Raw rainwater is likely to contain a lot of rubbish. A system that rejects the first run off from a dry catchment area and passes the rest of the water through a series of settlement tanks and filters, should produce fairly clean water.

It probably wouldn't work a sprinkler, but I happily run a seeper hose off a rainwater butt. It just takes longer than if it were connected to the mains.
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How many times has that happened in a domestic context in the UK?
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On 05/06/2018 10:33, Handsome Jack wrote:

No idea, but obviously it is considered enough of a risk for the Water Byelaws and their successors to have required for decades that domestic water cisterns be insect proof.
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On 04/06/2018 19:16, Jeff Layman wrote:

Ditto the pipework....
ALl my potable cold water and hot water pipes are all in copper.
I did the rain water pipework in white plastic so its clear whats inside the pipes when floorboards are lifted
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On 04/06/18 21:22, Stephen wrote:

Some friends of mine used to live in a farmhouse in West Wales, and their water came from a well. It came to the house via copper pipes, and there were blue stains under the taps on the porcelain sinks!
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On 04/06/2018 21:22, Stephen wrote:

White plastic pipe is intended for domestic waste water, so most people would assume it to be empty unless something was actively running to waste. Grey BS 3050 pipe would be a better choice as being something not normally found in domestic installations. Also, if the water is being pumped. BS 3505 pipe is pressure rated, while white waste pipe is not.
Alternatively, you could apply British Standard identifying colours along the length of the pipes, to show what is in them. For drinking water, the colours are three equal width bands of green, blue and green respectively. For rainwater, the two outer green bands remain, but the blue one is replaced by three equal width bands of grey, black and grey.
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