Pro paint finish and dust / bits in paint

I now hate painting (especially gloss), due to "bits" that always appear in the paint. I would like to know in a professional gloss painted thing, say a white gloss door, how many "pimples" beyond a mirror finish should be expected.
The bits seem to be: 1. Dust from the air 2. "bits" in the undercoat that show up more in the gloss coat 3. Bits that were trapped in corners of mouldings that you though were gone 4. Bits from re-using a paintbrush 5. Bits possibly already in the paint.
Tips I have heard are: 1. Hoover the room first 2. Hoover the workpiece 3. Clean the workpiece with a tack cloth 4. Use a new brush (but apparenly pros use the same brush for years) 5. Close doors after painting and leave 6. Pick out any bits that you see as you paint with a rag 7. Sand each undercoat. This is the correct way to do it, but it ridiculously time consuming, and a potential source of more dust.
Problems are: 1. The bits sometimes only appear in different light that the conditions during painting, so you only notice it when too late. 2. Once bits appear, they get on the workpiece / brush / paint and seem to multiply. 3. I don't know what finish I am aiming for (nothing is "perfect")
I fitted primed white bannisters recently and they have a lovely smooth finish, but should really be painted to cover joints, edges etc. I do not want to paint these as they will look worse. I do wonder how good it would be if I got someone in.
Any advice or experience on this issue would be very helpful.
Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, October 29, 2013 11:26:32 AM UTC, sm_jamieson wrote:

in the paint. I would like to know in a professional gloss painted thing, s ay a white gloss door, how many "pimples" beyond a mirror finish should be expected.

ne

My experience is that new paintbrushes shed occasional bristles that were n ot properly attached. After a few cycles of use and cleaning this drops to a very low level - possibly in some cases it would rise at end of life beca use the glue is breaking down but mine have normally worn away before this. You do need to clean the brushes carefully to avoid getting bits of dried p aint coming out instead of the bristles...

usly

I remember watching the prfessionals do the painting at my parents - I noti ced that they always decanted the paint into a paint kettle before using it , and they would strain it through an old nylon stocking while doing so to remove any bits. They would also store the brushes in water when leaving th em for the night, rather than cleaning them - the water kept the air away a nd stopped the paint drying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, October 29, 2013 12:33:09 PM UTC, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Picking out shed bristles is no problem - they are easily spotted. Its cleaning the brushes enough to remove all paint that will reappear as dried bits. The paint up near the handle is impossible to get out.

I always decant, and in small amounts. The straining would be a right pain and get through a lot of stockings (thinks: father ted in lingerie department ...)
Storing in water would be useful for oil-based paints. You could probably "keep a brush going" with, say, white gloss for ages and never need to clean it properly, thus avoiding bristles and dry bits.
Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 29 Oct 2013 05:33:09 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wrapping in clingfilm or alu-foil achieves much the same, as well as preserving shape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 30/10/2013 10:03, Apellation Controlee wrote:

Or a plastic bag
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get a man in, you know it makes sense. ;-)
Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, October 29, 2013 12:44:28 PM UTC, Tim+ wrote:

Oh I just can't ... surely not ... oh go on then ... hangs head in shame. I mean, painting is the most DIY'd thing there is out there.
Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh, anyone can slap a bit of paint on. Doing it *properly* is another matter. I hate the stuff. ;-)
Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You need to stop buying cheap paint brushes which are the source of most of your problems. And thoroughly clean them, the other source. (Debris in the brush.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 29/10/2013 17:12, harryagain wrote:

Just remember the undercoat should account for 99% of the finish. That can be toshed on any old how and is designed to be sanded. When it's as smooth as a baby's bum, and has obliterated any trace of the substrate, the topcoat/gloss is applied sparingly as if you're running out of paint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, October 29, 2013 5:12:42 PM UTC, harry wrote:

Cheap brushes may leave brush marks and not hold much paint, but I don't think they contribute more to "bits" or shed more bristles than expensive brushes. I think the problem is that it is almost impossible to fully clean a brush. You cannot remove all the slightly dried paint trapped in the top of the bristles near the handle. And if you spin the brush the bristles end up splayed out for ever more.
Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Snip I heard a talk once given by a chap who painted historic carriages. Among other things he mentioned;
he bought Italian paintbrushes at 150 quid each and then used them to creosote a rough fence. This 'broke in' the brushes and removed any loose bristles
he worked in a closed room with damp newspaper on the floor. After painting one small panel he would tip-toe out and close the door slowly, then leave the paint to dry for a long time.
next, rub down the panel, remove all the dust, let the air settle and then repeat painting the panel.
Repeat the process many times and then work on the next panel.
The job would take many weeks but gave a mirror finish.
Me, I use cheapo brushes from the pound shop and accept a less than perfect result!
--
Chris Holford

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Holford wrote:

I like to paint things that can be laid flat. Then I can pour the paint on and just use the brush to spread it around.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, October 30, 2013 5:41:46 AM UTC, Bill Wright wrote:

The disadvantage of things laid flat is that there is a greater surface area to airborne dust, assuming air currents are mostly vertical. Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, October 29, 2013 11:26:32 AM UTC, sm_jamieson wrote:

in the paint. I would like to know in a professional gloss painted thing, s ay a white gloss door, how many "pimples" beyond a mirror finish should be expected.

ne

usly

Yes to all those except: a used brush sheds less than a new one IME a very light sanding, which is all thats required, is quick & easy
I also like to fill any little dings & slice off any sticking out bits with a scraper before painting, it makes the whole thing look much better.

during painting, so you only notice it when too late.
You do need good light when painting, standard household lighting is nowher e near enough. More like a 100w bulb 12" from the surface.

o multiply.

inish, but should really be painted to cover joints, edges etc. I do not wa nt to paint these as they will look worse. I do wonder how good it would be if I got someone in.

If you really need the best finish, hoover everywhere thoroughly, put down damp newspaper or spray the floor, use a tack cloth, and use spray paint. D on't stay in the room once sprayed, as people are the source of a lot of th e bits. And always sand lightly between coats, unless perfection is already achieved.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, October 30, 2013 2:26:30 PM UTC, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

r in the paint. I would like to know in a professional gloss painted thing, say a white gloss door, how many "pimples" beyond a mirror finish should b e expected.

gone

lously

th a scraper before painting, it makes the whole thing look much better.

s during painting, so you only notice it when too late.

ere near enough. More like a 100w bulb 12" from the surface.

to multiply.

finish, but should really be painted to cover joints, edges etc. I do not want to paint these as they will look worse. I do wonder how good it would be if I got someone in.

n damp newspaper or spray the floor, use a tack cloth, and use spray paint. Don't stay in the room once sprayed, as people are the source of a lot of the bits. And always sand lightly between coats, unless perfection is alrea dy achieved.

I would also be useful to know how to get all the dust off a brush once you get some on it, since once it appears, it seems to get spread around. Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.