Poor workmanship - mine

We recently had our bathroom reconstituted and tiled following a flood.
I decided that I would do the floor having Amtico'd several only 40 years ago. I soon found out that the stuff they sell today is like tissue paper.
Preparation of course is 60-70% of the job. The sub floor was reasonable but there was a depression that needed raising.
The answer - screed. The last one I did, very successfully was only in 2004.
Which brings me up to date. I had to do it in batches because it was impossible to get all of it mixed and up the stairs quickly. I used Wickes quick setting. Normally that would be OK I suspect but our weather during the last two weeks has been reminiscent of 1976.
Anyway, the result is a bit 'er lumpy. I decided to sand it with my power drill and attachments. That does work but I needed to use an ancient but little used Black & Decker hand tool first to level the larger blobs.
I have come to the conclusion that as soon as i reach a reasonable level I should stop and fill the remaining dips with a filler that is easily sanded, something like a cream that be dragged with a flat edge, like I used on my last car.
Any (constructive) comments from those currently holding their sides will be most welcome.
Alan
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On 10/08/2018 16:11, Pinnerite wrote:

Rather than filler there are a number of floor levelling compounds that would make things so much easier.
I used a diamond floor grinding disk to level an aspect of a floor. I would say that apart from the dust, it worked very well.
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On 10/08/2018 16:23, Fredxx wrote:

Leveller seems to be amazing stuff.
We had a bathroom replaced recently, including removing some tiles I laid maybe 20 years ago and laying new ones.
They just chiselled up the old ones, removing most of the adhesive etc. There was some other work to move a radiator etc but, after that, they just put down levelling compound before tiling. The results are excellent.
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On 10/08/2018 16:11, Pinnerite wrote:

"up the stairs" seems to imply a floor on timber joists, so screed would not seem appropriate. Do you have upper floors made of beam and block or prestressed concrete panels ?.
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On 10/08/2018 20:50, Andrew wrote:

My thoughts too. I was going to ask whether there are any self-levelling compounds that can be applied where there is a suspended floor.
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On 10/08/18 21:49, newshound wrote:

All of them BUT beware of flexible upper floors..
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I bet the old drill outperformed the modern crap by miles. Brian
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On Saturday, 11 August 2018 11:22:30 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

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He never stood a chance. But the oldies do more than people assume. I made a maybe 2.5" hole through masonry with an old 275w? B&D once, due to not ha ving brought the right bits, the holesaw couldn't be used in the modern dri ll. It had no trouble doing it.
The same machine also drilled lots of inch plus holes in an unknown but exc eptionally hard wood - the only gotcha was I had to counterrotate the chuck by hand a turn or so each time, as it has no reverse. I'm glad we got bett er today, but they are usable.
NT
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