Pipe bending



Are you sure it's not 3/4"pipe?
Some more recent pipe is in "half hard" condition and is not intended for bending. (It has a very thin wall)
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On 05/10/2014 19:05, harryagain wrote:

When did they last sell 3/4 copper pipe in the sheds?
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On 05/10/2014 19:05, harryagain wrote:

More bollocks from harry.
*all* commonly available pipe is half hard these days, and has been so for many years.
Its perfectly suited to bending with a proper bender. The thing you can't do so easily with half hard pipe is use a bending spring.

That does not stop it bending.
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John.
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On 05/10/14 21:40, John Rumm wrote:

You would not spring bend 22mm or 28mm around your knee - but you might with a hole through a bit of 2x4 wood - that was my old man's preferred method. Might stil have said bit of wood kicking around with a nicely rounded off pair of holes (one for 15, one for 22).
Bending springs are handy if you need to make a few degrees tweak to a machine bend to fit perfectly - either bending some more or unbending a tad. Never try without a spring - you can do about 1 degree before it kinks - been there...
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Tim Watts wrote:

I've done 90° bends in 22mm on my knee ... wouldn't fancy 28mm though.
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Getting the spring out is easy. Bend the pipe a bit "too far" and then ""straigthten is slightly (only a couple of degrees needed) and the spring will come out easy.
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alan_m wrote:

That's not sod's law, it's feckless, profligate, wanton foolishness. Never, EVER throw anything away. You never know, it might come in, and even if it doesn't you'll have the continuing pleasure of ownership.
I learnt this principle at my father's knee, and I can look at our shelves and see items such as a box of Art Deco Bakelite radio knobs, a collection of Wylex mains plugs, a spokeshave without a blade, a brand new oil filter for a 1948 Morris Commercial, and a flat iron with a chunk out of it.
Bill
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On 05/10/2014 20:23, Bill Wright wrote:

I never throw away useless junk!
My father, when he was alive, always kept things claiming they would come in useful one day. After his death, and my mother wanted to move house, we had to hire a large skip to get rid of all this useful stuff - nothing was kept.
I'm trying not to keep anything I haven't used/seen for a couple of years, especially old electronic equipment. It may have been relatively expensive when I purchased it when when I upgrade its usually worth next to nothing and difficult to even give away.
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On Sunday, October 5, 2014 8:23:30 PM UTC+1, Bill Wright wrote:

3/5 are probably saleable
NT
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I've used dry sand to bend 28mm copper pipe, but that's because I don't have a 28mm pipe bender. Dry sand or liquid lead sealed in were the traditional ways to bend large copper tube.
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Andrew Gabriel
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For 28mm, I used dry sand fill, and bent it over a bag of builders sand. That was after carefully anealing just the area where I wanted it to bend, and that worked well as it didn't bend outside the freshly anealed area. The instructions came from a very old book on working with copper, which I found in a second-hand book stall in Luton market many years ago. The bend required was only about 20 degrees.
To clean out any sand dust afterwards (as it's a gas pipe), I used the vacuum cleaner to suck a large cotton wool ball through the pipe many times.
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Andrew Gabriel
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http://www.screwfix.com/p/plumbing-tools-by-rothenberger-internal-pipe-bending-spring-22mm/46276
Now that's a perfect way to get ripples with half hard tube...
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*A day without sunshine is like... night.*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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That is the main problem with them - you can't really use them half way along a length of tubing - unlike with a proper pipe bender. Which in lots of cases means an extra joint.
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*Of course I'm against sin; I'm against anything that I'm too old to enjoy.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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You can with a length of strong string attached and help from gravity:-)

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Tim Lamb

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On Mon, 6 Oct 2014 12:03:03 +0100, Tim Lamb wrote:

half way

Provided the pipe doesn't grip the spring too tighly and needs "winding up" to give it a smaller diameter to get out.
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Dave.
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Does anyone know why the move to half-hard tube was made? Was it to compensate for the tube being thinner with respect to compression fittings?
Apart from such fittings, is there any reason that annealing a section of tube for bending (as Andrew suggests) would cause any problems?
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I've read about doing this - but when I have used a spring for other than a very gentle bend it has to be 'unwound' to remove. Knowing my luck the string would simply break. So I'll stick to my pipe bender - which cost a lot of money ages ago. Now they've come down in price so much there's no excuse not to have one.
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*Funny, I don't remember being absent minded.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 06/10/14 13:10, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

You are right - the springs almost always need "winding up" to remove for any serious bend in copper pipe.
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We are talking about flat section springs? The only time I had this problem was with serious *crenellation*! Spell checker didn't like that!
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Tim Lamb

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On 06/10/14 14:25, Tim Lamb wrote:

Almost square section coils on the few rusty old ones I have...

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