Permission for TV aerial.

If you have a house with a chimney stack shared with next door do you need their permission to mount a TV aerial etc on that stack?
--
*The closest I ever got to a 4.0 in school was my blood alcohol content*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 2007-08-27 00:52:51 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

I've never come across that through having experience of living in several houses with this in the past and having antennas fitted.
However, I always did mention it as a courtesy.
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London SW

At a guess Id say no if its bolted to the part of the chimney that belongs to you.
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And what if you secure it using a wire?
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London SW

belongs
Then don't, use an H bracket and secure it by screws or smallest rawl bolts bought. :-) save a trivial of an argument in the pub
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I would have thought it would come under the Party Wall Act, but I doubt anyone bothers with that just for an aerial.

Wires can do a good job of holding manky chimney stacks together, whereas bolting to one side can eventually cause the aerial to pull chunks out of such a stack in a wind, or as a large bird launches itself off the aerial. (If it's not a manky stack now, it may be one day.)
If you bolt it, don't bolt it near the top of the chimney, but do it lower down where you have a good weight of brickwork on top of the supporting bricks. Use a strong rigid pole and avoid a bigger aerial than you need (larger wind resistance) so it won't whip back and fourth on the wind, stressing the mounting brickwork. Use bracket(s) which spread the mounting points over a wide number of bricks. Might be a good idea to avoid using plastic rawl bolts on chimneys which still use their flues.
I put one up a couple of years ago using rawl bolts, and it's still OK. In hind sight, I would have used a more rigid pole and a smaller aerial. I also bought a lashing kit, but I couldn't work out how to get it round the chimney when I basically only had access to one corner of it.
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Andrew Gabriel
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writes: . I also bought a lashing kit, but I

ah ha, you need one of them trained squirrels you do
--
Vass



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On 27/08/2007 08:48, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

I used the larger version of this bracket with ratchet tightened strap, http://www.blake-uk.com/prod_products_installation_stackstrap.aspx
very easy to install and gave a secure fix.
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Interesting. A lot more expensive, though.
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*Why isn't there a special name for the back of your knee?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 27/08/2007 11:25, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Yes but I don't have tools or know-how to how to use lashing wire properly, it made sense for a one-off (I'd already saved enough by visiting blake's trade counter)
Also you can fit it from one edge without worrying how to get the corner-plates positioned for the lashing wire, though a mirror on a stick was useful to make sure I'd not got any twists in it.
I believe they sell a re-badged version of the smaller bracket in B&Q, presumably even more expensive ...
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If you don't have the bottle to do it is a bigger worry. I used to do that on a daily basis many years ago on some very big chimneys but the other month I had to do one as a favour on a semi and it was scary!..
However I don't find a climb up a 40 odd metre mast the slightest worry possibly its that harness which is constantly connected;)
--
Tony Sayer



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How do those work?
Do you have to keep unclipping them and reclipping them as you climb?
Heights still give me the willies. Anything more than gutter level is out.
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scribeth thus

Some do, some climbers go up then attach their harness, and some don't bother even!. There is a system called "railok" a sort of extrusion section that allows rapid movement up .. but not down. I just use a couple of clips like Karibiners so that one is always connected. Baby walker its otherwise known as;-)
Theres a comms install at the top of Ely cathedral thats quite fun, you have to walk across to it on a ladder some 228 feet above ground level nice view tho!, can be a bit of a bu**er when its windy, nowt on the fens to stop the wind;!.,..
--
Tony Sayer



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Hang on Tony, you don't mind climbing up a 120+ ft mast because you once was a chimney sweep, you are a fool, how did you harness yourself to the top of the mast then, I have been a specialist heights engineer for 15 yrs + and you are the thickest idiot I have ever heard, do you think there is any reason to climb up the mast to align an aerial, if so tell me why, I abseil off blocks of flats daily and still can not work out how you pay for a helicopter to fix your harness to the top of the mast, we on the other hand take the mast off the bracket test the components and align from the ground with a meter, chim chimeny chim chimney chim chim cheroo, leave it to the pros coz your not that bright....
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snipped-for-privacy@TISCALI.CO.UK scribeth thus

Being fairly tolerant and generous to a fault I'll ignore your abusive remarks as part of your ignorance on the subject..
The mast in question was a free standing structure used for telecoms purposes and as such is fitted with "Railok" to which you can attach a full body harness to, and with this you are "connected" to the structure at all times. The device is arranged so that movement in the one upwards direction is very easy, however if you move at the slightest bit too fast in the downward direction in a fall situation it locks up thus arresting the fall.
And me old chum you very often have to attend to various equipment's on such structures for things like microwave links etc which you can't line up on the ground.....
--
Tony Sayer



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On Sep 10, 2:39 am, snipped-for-privacy@TISCALI.CO.UK wrote:

Now I understand why people like this are tagged "Tiscali idiot".
MBQ
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On Sep 10, 2:39 am, snipped-for-privacy@TISCALI.CO.UK wrote:

You should have taken some time out for grammar lessons.
MBQ
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snipped-for-privacy@TISCALI.CO.UK writes

Eh who what?
If you know as much about heights as you say you do then how the heck do you think people climb masts? There are many different safety systems, such as:
http://www.stonesafetyuk.com/pages/systems/manufacturer=sala/product=Lads af
http://www.stonesafetyuk.com/pages/systems/manufacturer=sala/product=Rail ok
where you attach a harness to. The most basic though would be a harness with 2 lanyards and you make your way up/down by fixing one, moving fixing the 2nd one and then refixing the 1st.
The pros that I know who do this have been doing for years with no problems. If you don't mind I'll leave it to them rather than you.
--
Bill

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CAI and Sky don't allow fixing using bolts to a stack, the reason is because it is not a load bearing structure, I have seen 3 stacks collapse by other ppl, I do bolt to the stack occasionally when needs must, but as a DIYer Andrew G I would stick to your own house and not advise ppl to drill into the stack, I have drilled a stack with written consent from the owner before install and the vibration cascaded soot into the front room, customer tryed to sue, but had written consent.
It is against Health and safety regulations to drill into the stack LOL this will void your house insurance when a 20000 bill for building work comes through the door, next time you tell someone to drill into a 1-2 ton unstable structure looming on top of their house with no house insurance think before you put your foot in your mouth.
I am a CAI SKY Microsoft Ericsson Lucent accredited Special heights Engineer
Mash up your own house not others
Pay the man 150 pound for a single aerial feed + 40-65 for each extra point, thats the going rate for ppl that can install lashing kits.
Oh yeh the chimney in the middle of two building is communal, if it is installed the neighbour would have to take you to court and loose, if the neighbour damages the install that is a criminal offence, hope that cleared that one up LOL
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