OT (slightly): grade 2 listed buildings - practical experiences?

Having been in the same house for just over 30 years we're considering a move to a more "interesting" house, but many of them are grade II listed and some thatched. It would be great to hear from anyone here who has experience of listed houses. Some questions are: how restrictive is grade 2 listing? and what are the typical real world maintenance problems? ... but any info would be useful at this stage.
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On 20/01/17 10:59, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

The problem is you must always repair back rather than rip out, and upgrade.
This makes any major maintenance relatively expensive. - 2-5 times typically
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2017 11:04:16 +0000, The Natural Philosopher

Additionally a lot of such buildings may also be part of a conservation area which may mean a few more restrictions/controls, and having one in a National Park involves another level of people you may have to deal with.
G.Harman
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On 20/01/2017 11:04, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

It also depends a lot on what architectural features and window frames the building has. You may find that double glazing is not permitted and new window frames have to be handmade to an exact match specification.
If there is dry rot or anything else nasty going on then you may not have a choice but to remove and replace like for like. Repair and restore is always preferred as a first approach though. The inspectors seemed to be fairly pragmatic when it was a choice between renovating sympathetically or leaving the building derelict until it fell down.

I guess thatch is slightly less problematic than obscure handmade claypan tiles in that respect. But labour costs obviously much higher. Anyone buying a grade II listed building needs to go in with their eyes and wallets open. Other things that can make life tricky are having resident bats which obviously limits when you can replace the roof.
My house might have been listed if it had not been unsympathetically extended well before the legislation came into force. Many of the other old buildings in our village are listed - one is even a grade 2* (and recently renovated to habitability at great expense). The manor house would have been grade I listed if it hadn't been demolished in the 50's.
As a concrete example they had to remove the original Victorian hexagonal tiles from the stable walls without damaging them before starting work and replace them again afterwards (as a nice feature). Seemed like a lot of faff to me but looking online they may well be incredibly rare since I can't find any published examples.
There was also a rare Arts&Crafts wooden staircase designed by William Morris that had to be dismantled and reassembled in a new position. Things like this take a lot of time and skilled craftsmen.
Fun to watch them at work if you are not paying for it.
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On Friday, 20 January 2017 11:35:33 UTC, Martin Brown wrote:

...

But I'd hope that anyone would do those without being required to by listing.
Personally I'm on the lookout for a nice 1970s bungalow to which I can add plastic windows and those pierced concrete wall blocks round the pat-yo.
Owain
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2017 11:35:29 +0000, Martin Brown wrote:

Yes, living in a listed building is expensive, but it keeps the riff-raff out.
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On 20/01/2017 12:32, mechanic wrote:

Sadly not in our experience. Grade 2 listed building "project" in South Devon. Nice neighbours either side for a few years then one side trotted off to Southampton and handed tenancy to local council.
First lot were OK for a year then "she" became a fruit cake and he stayed inside stoned. Both paranoid and she would get very feisty and verbally attack us for no reason.
Next lot, she was OK but had and looked after wayward kids, some were her own which included a child mother who would throw shtty nappies into our garden and they'd park on our drive... These were the worst ones. Dirty bastard kids and their mates though the mother was honestly trying to keep them in control.
Current lot have 6 kids or so but they seem quite nice though we've not been down for a while due to other commitments.
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On Friday, 20 January 2017 10:59:17 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

A lot depends on what *actually* is listed and on what you want to do.
If it's timber frame you may be allowed to knock out some infill in walls t o open up a room, but you probably will not be allowed to remove any of the actual timber frame itself. If it's Georgian you may be able to knock thro ugh a stud wall, between rooms, but only partially, to preserve any cornice detail, and will have to satisfy the conservation officer how you intend t o match up the floor and wall joins.
With current thinking you might be allowed to add a glass spaceship to the side (because it 'preserves the narrative' of the building) but a little mo ck-period side extension might be prohibited.
You need to check very carefully for any unauthorised works by previous own ers that have been done since listing. There is a risk you might have to re verse them.
periodproperty forum may be useful.
Owain
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2017 03:20:51 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

Seems to depend on the people in the planning dept of the local autority.
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On 20/01/2017 12:33, mechanic wrote:

Agree Substantial internal changes I wanted to make to my plain Georgian terraced house were agreed by Conservation Officer in a letter " the internal changes will NOT affect the special interest of this listed building and consent will not be needed". Recent replacement of a large dormer window , the planning authority went out of the way to agree a plan which was " a repair" and didnt need permission , this included changing to double glazing and an extra opening light. Pros of selling a listed building - no EPC needed.
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On 1/22/2017 9:21 AM, Robert wrote:

I didn't know that.
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On Mon, 23 Jan 2017 22:09:51 +0000, newshound wrote:

This is the smallest 'listed building' that I know. And probably the cheapest to maintain.
https://goo.gl/maps/TpKrNhCfbF62
(yes, it's the post in the middle. Just the post.)
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ROFL.
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On Mon, 23 Jan 2017 22:22:27 +0000, Huge wrote:

Ah, here we are.
http://www.bhuntold.co.uk/78-west-street/
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Whoop-de-doo. You get to save £45 for a stupid piece of paper than no-one ever looks at or gives a damn about.
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On 23/01/17 22:21, Huge wrote:

Didn't even save me a penny, agent who sold my flat (listed GII) included the EPC as part of the service (well given the fee, well they might).

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I have 2 friends who live in listed houses. And to answer your question, put it this way - when we were recently looking at houses we automatically discounted anything listed.
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2017 10:59:16 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

They can be very expensive. Listing covers the whole building, inside and out and often the surrounds. The person responsible is the local conservation officer (CO). The quality of these CO's varies and they tend to make things up as they go along so advice from one may be turned on it's head if a new CO arrives on the scene. If contemplating purchase you need to employ a surveyor with listed building expertise and make sure all work in the past has been approved, if not it is the current occupier who must pay for remedial work.
Sometimes it isn't obvious (or sensible). A friend bought a listed house and discovered later that a previous owner had built a covered walkway to match period ones on adjacent buildings. The work was carried out to a very high standard and indistinguishable from that on other nearby houses. A new CO discovered that the original walkway (identical to the replacement) had been demolished many years ago and replaced by a nasty tinplate lean to in the 1920's. However, as this wriggly tin had been in position on the date the property was listed years later she required the owner to demolish the high quality walkway and replace it with rusty tinplate.
While the owner has the responsibility to follow the dozens of manuals and regulations they are hideously complex. Historic England helpfully says "What activity does and does not require permission or consent is a matter of considerable complexity and is the most common area of misunderstanding." Not getting consent when it is required is a criminal act.
Insurance can be a minefield. Normal insurance isn't usually adequate as it won't cover things like reinstatement using period materials and techniques.
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On 20/01/17 12:43, Peter Parry wrote:

Don't forget too that fire insurance for a thatched property will be considerably higher than for a tiled/stone roof.
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On Friday, 20 January 2017 12:55:04 UTC, Jeff Layman wrote:

A friend was going to buy a listed building but found he couldn't get flood insurance.
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