New disabled staircase?

wrote:

One benefit of a stair lift is that even if your legs and lungs still work reasonably well you can use them to carry things which for people who may suffer discomfort from lifting or carrying makes life easier. A stair lift was installed for my father when he became too weak to climb stairs but he probably only used it a couple of times a day, in contrast my mother used it up to a dozen times a day for moving laundry/vacuum cleaner ,medical supplies, kettle and supplies for morning tea and loads of other things. Without it she may have struggled to look after him so easily and exacerbated her own painful hip problems.
She has moved since and twenty years on has installed one for her own benefit, sometimes she feels fit enough to choose not use it but sending things like some library books or her IPad up first means she has two hands free to steady herself should it be necessary which could save a fall with all the attendant problems that can cause in elderly person.
That for me if we didn't live in a Bungalow would be good enough reason to get one sooner to make life easier/safer rather than wait till it gets essential. And being realistic you may get some decent wear out of an expensive investment rather than just a couple of years before you snuff it.
Someone mentioned up thread that a good local independent installers are more desirable and often less expensive than one of the national chains. This is probably true and they may fit a used unit more eagerly than a large firm and will maintain it cheaper, it is the route that my Mother took after having one recommended and having him service the previous lift. He would not fit refit the previous one as he said it was too old, 3 or 4 years rings a bell but don't know if this an Industry good practice recommendation or just his personal way of working. Anyhow he found an 18 month old chair that would suit though the track had to be all new as it had to go around a 180 turn as it rose. For that model a http://www.platinumstairlifts.com/products/curve-stairlift/ the track is made to order and at the time there was a bit of a backlog so mothers installer went up to the factory from Devon to Yorkshire and assembled some of the parts himself to speed things up.
One caveat with an independent though is that they may be a sole trader. Good as he his Mothers installer was on Holiday between Christmas and New Year when the chair misbehaved and needed attention. He tried to talk me through some steps on the phone to resolve the issue but with the limited tool kit that mother has in the house I could not get into the innards beyond checking some micro switches had not shifted. So mother had to wait a week* , a national will have engineers available all the time though the service plans are costly.
* In dire need he probably would have attended but it was a case of "It's my only break I take each year,is there anyway you can manage?"
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writes

I don't bother. I do notice when someone I have known dies but don't really care if I didn't notice in time for the funeral etc. I've only bothered to go to the one funeral.

I don't bother about either. I did consider buying a portable generator but decided that we get so few power cuts that last long enough to matter. I did buy one for very little at a garage/yard sale but haven't even gotten around to trying it because power cuts are so rare.
I do have a couple of rechargeable torches that are permanently plugged into the mains and which come on automatically when the mains fails, but that is more for the convenience with torches than because the mains fails often.
The last time we had the mains fail for long it was due to a massive storm which took out quite a few major trees in the area and some power lines. Spend most of the time standing around outside talking to the neighbours and wandering around looking at what damage had occurred.

I did it the other way, chose to have a house that would be easy to use even if I wasn't very mobile at all anymore.
I don't plan to stick around when I'm not capable of wiping my own arse or not capable of feeding myself. Fuck that for a viable lifestyle.
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On 12/02/2016 19:28, DICEGEORGE wrote:

Keep it as simple as possible, and make sure its wide enough. So straight runs are best.

Of the normal built in ones, loads! Stannah, Minivator, and plenty others. Finding a second hand or recon one can save lots.
You can get tempory ones designed to climb stairs with a wheelchair on board - although they normally need an assistant to drive them.
--
Cheers,

John.
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On 12/02/2016 16:19, DICEGEORGE wrote:

Lots!
Avoid the large national firms that advertise widely. Small local firms have access to exactly the same stairlifts but without the badge! The price will be about half.
The stairlift should run from a built-in battery that is constantly on trickle charge. Direct power from the mains is not a good idea.
It should have two remote handsets so it can be controlled from both ends.
Check that the load carrying capacity is well above the weight of any likely user.
I'd forget a wheelchair stairlift for domestic use. If you really need a wheelchair lift it wants to be a vertical lift.
Bill
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On 12/02/2016 16:19, DICEGEORGE wrote:

Alternatively, how about an elevator? Friends just had one fitted as he's had a stroke.
--
Nige Danton - Replace the obvious with g.m.a.i.l

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On Saturday, 13 February 2016 03:39:56 UTC, Bill Wright wrote:

IME batteries fail more often than mains. But they fail gradually, so you don't get stuck half way. If you're able to extricate yourself on loss of power, albeit it awkwardly, then mains is more reliable & avoids battery cost.
NT
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I would have thought a lift shaft on the outside should be the best way - but not aware of many suppliers compared to stair lifts.
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On 13/02/2016 09:31, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

loss of power, albeit it awkwardly, then mains is more reliable & avoids battery cost.
The battery is routinely replaced every two years. Total failure of a battery that is always on charge is highly unlikely. With the charger always connected the user would at most notice a slowing down of the machine. The discharge period is only about 60 secs.
An advantage of battery is that there is no voltage exceeding 13.6V on the machine or the track. This is good because the disabled can spill drinks and are sometimes incontinent.
The mains-only machines tended to have a power chain on the track and it was a source of trouble. The battery machines have a power strip with a brush running on it and this seems to work better.
Bill
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On Saturday, 13 February 2016 13:48:32 UTC, Bill Wright wrote:

Mains and motor being stationary avoids those issues. I'm not a great fan of what I've seen of the popular machines, they do seem so issuefully designed.
NT
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On Friday, 12 February 2016 16:19:12 UTC, DICEGEORGE wrote:

I wouldn't install an expensive lift now, because you don't know what sort of lift will be needed in the future. No use in having a sit-on stairlift if you're unable to transfer to it from a wheelchair, etc.
As others have suggested, a wide straight staircase with space at top and bottom will cover most eventualities.
Another approach is to have a cupboard on each level with a removable floor which can easily be converted to form a lift shaft if you do need a 'traditional' lift.
If you rely on any sort of lift you have to consider fire escape from the upper floor - even if a battery stairlift works in a fire it may be difficult to use in smokey conditions.
The best future-proofing is probably to provide space for a downstairs bedroom and level access shower, even if you retain a lift of some sort for occasional access to upstairs for access to possessions etc.
Really radical idea - is there space in the garden for a ramp to upstairs?
Owain
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On Saturday, 13 February 2016 10:05:54 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

re fire escape, stair lifts are typically crazily slow. You'd be roasted by the time you were halfway down.
NT
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On 13/02/2016 10:21, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A fire refuge, effectively a one hour fire protected cupboard with ventilation from outside that the fire brigade can access, preferably from outside the building, is probably a better option for the disabled on an upper floor.
--
Colin Bignell

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Depends on how early in the fire you use it.
It isnt hard to make the place very fireproof so it wont catch fire particularly with a house designed that way from the start.
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On Saturday, 13 February 2016 18:08:46 UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

not really.

Lol
NT
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Yes, really.

You never could bullshit your way out of a wet paper bag.
A place with concrete block or brick internal walls, a concrete slab and quarry tiles and furniture that is designed to be inflammable and no curtains, just say metal venetians or shutters etc isnt going to burn.
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designed to be inflammable ???
On Saturday, February 13, 2016 at 11:09:31 PM UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

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Doesn't burn.


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On Saturday, 13 February 2016 23:09:31 UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

You're funny.
Re the paper bag trick, I've never tried.
NT
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You never could bullshit your way out of a wet paper bag.
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On Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 7:39:34 PM UTC, Rod Speed wrote: [[doesnt burn]]
flammable = inflammable = burnable
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/inflammable The words inflammable and flammable both have the same meaning, 'easily set on fire'. This might seem surprising, given that the prefix in- normally h as a negative meaning (as in indirect and insufficient), and so it might be expected that inflammable would mean the opposite of flammable, i.e. 'not easily set on fire'. In fact, inflammable is formed using a different Latin prefix in-, which has the meaning 'into' and here has the effect of intens ifying the meaning of the word in English. Flammable is a far commoner word than inflammable and carries less risk of confusion.
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