moving stuff out to a shed

Due to some work in the house, i'm having to put a lot of books out in the
garden shed for a while. (Not ideal storage solution with U.k., weather i
know).
My idea is to wrap small bundles in a couple of Tescos super market bags to
try to keep the damp out. But Tescos bags (and other supermarket bags as far
as i know) have those tiny holes in them.
Would anyone know of any similar bags available that are without the holes,
preferably with the tie handles?
Reply to
john eastwood
On Jan 26, 1:11=A0pm, "john eastwood" wrote:
Use vacuum pack bags ? You suck the air out with a vacuum cleaner. Might not be cheap though. Simon.
Reply to
sm_jamieson
As far as I'm aware, bin liners don't have holes and are available in a range of sizes and with tie handles.
Reply to
Gareth
We use a good wrapping with clingfilm for putting things in the loft.
Not a perfect moisture barrier of course but it keeps boxes from going soft quite well and keeps things clean.
Leo
Reply to
Leo
====================================================================
Thanks. Though books are heavy, so much easier in small portions in carrier bags with handles.
Reply to
john eastwood
Bin liners are so thin though that I'd expect moisture vapour to be able to pass (slowly) through, and in to the books.
Depending on how long you are expecting to have the books out there, and how many, it might be worth considering a self storage place (which will be reliably dry). They aren't that expensive for a few weeks.
Reply to
Martin Bonner
Industrial cling film works well.
formatting link
presume that domestic cling film would also be effective.
Colin Bignell
Reply to
Nightjar
Tesco bags degrade quite quickly, especially in a damp environment. Pound shops etc. often sell vacuum bags, and definitely bin bags and clingfilm.
Si
Reply to
Mungo "Two Sheds" Toadfoot
On Jan 26, 1:11=A0pm, "john eastwood" wrote:
Builder's merchant, clear rubble sacks. Much heavier polythene, so the tear resistance is adequate. You can also tell which bundle you're looking for.
Seal with decent quality brown parcel tape. This outlasts sellotape or gaffer.
Assume that wrapped books are going in for at least a couple of years. It's easier to have to wrap twice as many small bundles than it is to carry big bundles, or to have to search through them later to find that one book (probably on bookshelf construction) you do need again.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
Kitchen bin liners from Sainsburys come with a tie cord. Couple of quid for 20. They are quite strong.
Reply to
Mr Pounder
On Jan 26, 1:11=A0pm, "john eastwood" wrote:
Would pedal bin liners be an option? You can get these with tie handles (although you'd likely need heavy duty ones).
I had a dozen large plastic boxes full of books stuck in a shed for over a year with no issues with dampness or mustiness but I did place some sillica gel based cat litter in each of the boxes to absorb any moisture that did get in. Not a clue if it made any difference but since I had it going spare it was worth a shot.
Tony
Reply to
Tony
In message , john eastwood writes
Small pedal bin liners? some of those have tie handles.
I'd be concerned about them tearing though.
Rubble sacks and some parcel tape?
go shopping in dunelm mills, their bags don't have holes in 9I used a few recently as bin liners
Reply to
chris French
In article ,
I don't think I'd use plastic of any description: I'd be worried about condensation. I think I'd buy some of those boxes used for moving house (cardboard boxes, flat-packed) and stash the books in those. I'd then cover the piles of boxes with decorator's dust sheets. These materials can absorb damp, and then lose it, as temps rise and fall.
But as someone else has remarked: how long in the shed? And is the shed reasonably robust, or just a cheap thin job (like I've got)? And how valuable are the books?
2p J.
Reply to
Another John
I think I'd be inclined to leave the books with a friend or neighbour, especially around this time of the year.
However, TV repairers used to use a heavy sort of 'clingfilm' to wrap around TVs to protect mainly the screen - this would be much more durable than kitchen-type stuff.
Reply to
Frank Erskine
Worse than that, Tesco bags bio-degrade, after a few months they turn to flakes of white carrier bag shrapnel.
Reply to
Andy Burns

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