Mould in bathroom

Hello people,
Back in April 2009 we got a 4" fan fitted in our bathroom in order to reduce condensation, mould etc as this was becoming more of a problem since we got our nice new powerful shower. However this didn't really make a difference and I think it may be the fan which is at fault because someone conned us saying he installs good quality fans but instead installed a cheap 15 one, the fault with it is that the air operated internal shutter only opens when there is absolutely no breeze because the force from the fan is not able to keep the shutter open.
There is a gap under the door and a trickle vent on the window, the room is 4.5mx4.5m.
Will replacing the fan for a better one (Vent Axia) which actually as thermo shutters or whatever its called do the trick? When there is no breeze the fan apart from being very noisy does keep the steam levels quite low.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A better quality fan may last longer or be quieter but unless it is more powerful then it is unlikely to make much difference in this situation. If the problem is as you say a constant headwind then I think that what you need is a centrifugal fan instead of an axial fan which is probably what you have. A centrifugal fan creates a greater pressure and is usually used to push air through long ducts. It may not shift the same number of cubic meters of air per hour though, you will need to have a look at the spec.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is a simple through the wall fan, won't a centrifugal one be quite noisy?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
harry wrote:

Yes, I agree that the proprietary anti-mould sprays are pretty affective.
Another point is that, even with a good extractor fan, after use you should run a cloth over the places where water accumulates.
I notice that, even on a warm day with the window open, it takes a long time for all traces of water to disappear. If it is colder and damper, with only the extractor to help, you are fighting a loosing battle.
My old bathroom got to look pretty grotty, partly because I was, if I'm honest, too lazy to wipe it down after showering. When it was replaced five years ago, including a generous shower and airbath, I turned over a new leaf, and it is all still in good order.
Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
snipped-for-privacy@cdixon.me.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mould resistant paint helps, and can be made by crushing soluble aspirin tablets into paint. A larger fan can help, 4" ones move very little air even when they do work. Locking the window in the slightly ajar position through the summer also helps, and locks to do that can be retrofitted. In winter it'll cost less and be more effective to use a dehumidifier than a fan.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

. . . and you can dry your washing at the same time instead of using an expensive tumble drier . . . . . . and then use the resulting condensed water in your steam iron
--
John Mulrooney
NOTE Email address IS correct but might not be checked for a while.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Good idea: should also get away from pumping all that expensively heated air out of the house, and making horrible cold draughts while you are in the bathroom.
S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
and making horrible cold draughts while you are in the

Most of the draughts I make in the bathroom are about 37 deg C - is that cold ? Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
robgraham wrote:

Ideal for anaerobic digestion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>
Thanks for all your helpful replies, a lot of food for thought!
However if we were to replace the extract fan, how hard will it be to swap the old SELV fan which is operated by a light switch with say a Vent Axia operated by a humidistat?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Our one came with multiple option for turning on and off: pull cord; timer; humidistat; lightswitch. Result, noone has a clue whether it is going to turn on or not, and can't turn it off when it comes on by mistake. Give me a simple manual on/off any day.
S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In message

The electrical dept. will advise on bathroom zones and extra low voltage:-)
regards
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Mould resistant paint helps, and can be made by crushing soluble aspirin tablets into paint. A larger fan can help, 4" ones move very little air even when they do work. Locking the window in the slightly ajar position through the summer also helps, and locks to do that can be retrofitted. In winter it'll cost less and be more effective to use a dehumidifier than a fan. NT
Interesting: not heard that one before. I always used to use zinc sulphate on the plaster and grout, but it does not seem to be very obtainable any more.
For typical cold tiled bathrooms, some simple measures like not running the hot water on its own, can make all the difference.
I keep two sprays in the bathroom - using empty cleaning product sprayers -: one of diluted bleach, the other of 20% citric acid (crystals by the kilo from your local Asian grocers). An occasional spray with the bleach keeps the mould at bay, and the citric takes all the limy splashes of the taps, and the film off the sink, bath, and shower cubical.
S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interesting that, how will I get the dehumidifier in the bathroom whilst still being safe etc?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

leave the bathroom door open and run the dehumidi on the landing /in a bedroom (also with door open;>) siimples!
Worked for us for 4years now (our extract fan used to wake the kids up so we only use during day for.. erm.. nasty niffs - mine - naturally, swmbo's are rosey and sometimes minty..... ;>)
Cheers Jim K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1. feed the air through holes in bathroom wall 2. put dehumidifier far enough away frm bath and use RCD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, we clean the mould off whenever it appears.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
harry wrote:

This stuff is excellent http://www.polycell.co.uk/products/polycell_mould_killer.jsp
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8 July, 20:30, "The Medway Handyman" <davidl...@no-spam- blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

Interesting that no one has come up with the point that must apply otherwise we would all have mould in our bathrooms - and that is that the OP's bathroom walls are clearly cold causing continuous condensation of the air in the bathroom. It really does make much sense to extract the air from the room if the walls are so cold that condensation will occur regardless.
My property is an old stone cottage - it was upgraded in the 1920's with wooden floors, underfloor ventilation and lathe and plaster walls. We bought in 1975 and in winter it was impossible to warm because despite 3 ft thick stone walls, their was no insulation behind the L and P. The house suffered badly from mould until all the L and P was ripped off, and the walls were relined with insulation. No mould - and never has been any since.
Insulate the walls is my suggestion.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.