Motherboard /processor upgrade ?

On Fri, 21 Dec 2012 16:53:59 +0000, John Rumm wrote:

When ordering from CPCC, I am always careful about what items I mix in the same order - for exactly that reason. I quite often get the tubs of dishwasher powder during the 'free carriage for orders over £10' WEBFREE offers.
--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Light bulbs, for example
--
geoff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 22 Dec 2012 19:49:43 +0000, geoff wrote:

Yep.
--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Aren't they supposed to be OK with the some i00 odd G or similar?...

Why?, having dome just thats the other month MB and CPU are doing fine!...

--
Tony Sayer



  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/12/2012 17:51, tony sayer wrote:

You'll find that is something like "dropped half an inch onto concrete".
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/12/2012 17:51, tony sayer wrote:

Quite possibly... and it sounds like plenty, however its alarming how easy it is to exceed that. Quick example: lets say you drop a HDD onto your desk - from a height of 1 cm
If we apply v^2 = u^2 + 2as we get v^2 = 0 + 2 x 10 x 0.01
So it hits the desk at about 0.45 m/sec
Now your desk is hard, but it must give a bit, so lets say if flexes (or dents) by a tenth of a mm under the impact:
0 = 0.45 + 2a x 0.0001
-0.45 / 0.0001 / 2 = 2250 m/sec^2 or about 225g

I would hope so after a month... report back in 18 ;-)
(not suggesting asrock are universally "bad" - just that some brands operate in a different price and quality bracket and don't seem to enjoy the longevity of some others - if you are a frequent upgrader, then this may not matter)
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK .. there is an outfit round here who has a hard drive "mincer" it does just that . His firm collects PC's takes the hard drives out and puts them in a machine that literally minces them into small chunks!..
We once tried to wreck some hard drives but hitting them with a hammer and throwing them at the floor not dropping them, throwing them. It was very surprising just how robust they were even with that treatment.
I suspect that it depends where the heads are WRT the drive surface at any given time..

The main problems we've had with PC's are...
Motherboards .. almost all caused by the duff capacitors that were made a while ago.
Power units .. mainly because of their uber low price something has to be underrated hence the failures, but this applies to a lot of other consumer grade stuff..
Hard drives but these seem to be better in recent years..
CD ROM drives .. but in more recent times seem to be better.
Memory and processors hardly any..
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/12/2012 14:19, tony sayer wrote:

Yes, very much so... I have destroyed a few, and it takes a 14lb sledge to do serious damage to them.
As with lots of these issues, the effect of impact damage is not necessarily immediate failure, but can manifest as a reduction in life. Much the same as with static damage.

Mostly I would say the same here, although I have had a recent slew of failures on relatively recent kit with bad caps again.

I had that conversation with one of our customers a while back. He wanted a quote for four new machines, and then queried the price saying he could buy the same spec off the internet for less. So I explained to him that the systems I was promoting were not really the same spec but were built to order units, with business class PSUs, decent mobos etc and came preloaded with a much closer match to his final software stack since we could spec what went on them. He was not convinced about the PSU argument since he believed they had suffered very few PSU failures in the past. Alas completely missing the irony that he was making my point for me, since we supplied the bulk of their PCs with decent PSUs!
In the end I ordered him "off the shelf" systems from our normal system builder at a price closer to his "cheaper" ones. I pointed out to him later that it took about an extra hour and a half of our time per machine to configure them for use, and that more than wiped out the savings.

Yup, don't think I have had many failures recently.

Memory, now and then. Processors, I can only recall one failure in over 20 years! (that was actually recently on a i3 box, still under warranty)
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

when I took the hard drive out of a desktop machine I then undid some screws and removed the cover and then the disk. It can be bent by putting it in vice and htting it witha hammer. Some of the coating flakes off, too.
cheaper than paying someone to use a 'mincer'.
--
From KT24

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah!, but you don't get a certificate of destruction for that to comply with some BS approval system!...
--
Tony Sayer




  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Dec 2012 17:17:48 +0000, Tim Streater

This is rubbish.
You can reinstall Windows from any suitable source, possibly even an illegal copy, and then run ...     KeyUpdateTool_enu.exe ... to enter the correct key from the label on the PC.
As an example, this PC is an old Dell Latitude 610 laptop, onto which I sysprep-ed my standard Windows 2000 build, the same build as I use on my desktops, which I then upgraded using an OEM XP SP3 installation disk which won't of itself pass as Genuine Windows*, yet it is now, using the above tool, authenticated as genuine XP using the original authentication code from the label on the bottom of the machine, and is fully updated, etc.
So I've got to use my original 2k build, with all the software painstakingly installed just how I wanted it, etc, as XP. This means that I've been able to install the drivers and software for my new mobile phone, and one or two more modern pieces of software, but without having to create a completely new build for XP. It may not seem much, but, AFAIAC, it's something of a coup!
* It was acquired via eBay in the expectation of it being usable in its own right from a sh*t who left eBay the moment he'd sold it - it turned out that, being OEM, it could be only be used by the OEM firm on the original OEM software, and could not be sold on for use on different hardware, and anyway Microshaft will not now authenticate any new versions of XP, even those in sealed packaging for which the key was never used.
It may be possible to authenticate on a *different* PC *retail* versions of XP acquired second-hand, I'm not sure, but certainly *OEM* versions will only authenticate on the *same hardware* as originally authenticated upon.

A linux, or perhaps a Mac, user, presumably.
I'm still trying to decide what to do with my new Dell Inspiron R SE, which came with W8, but is now running W7. Now that I've got this one running XP, do I really need it? Perhaps not, and I hate the more recent versions of Windows so much that I only use the Inspiron for media playback. I might sell it on, but that would mean having to reinstall W8, or I might try to put Linux on it.
--
=========================================================
Please always reply to ng as the email in this post's
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I usually put a cold chisel into mine before I sling them out.

Most, probably all, drives these days move the heads automatically on power off to the 'Landing Zone' where no data is kept.

One duff Gigabyte motherboard from a dodgy supplier who no longer gets my business, where the chipset fan failed and the chipset fried, replaced by a lesser specced one that wouldn't work reliably with SATA disks.

One duff PSU from same dodgy supplier in same order.

I've had a Connor, an IBM, and a WD go down. The WD was the most annoying, as it was a relatively new 500GB drive, just out of guarantee! The other two were acceptably old anyway.

My favourite trick with CD/DVD drives is to forget to put the tray back in when I've removed the disk, and then knocking the tray out with my knee as I get up from the desk. I've done this with two or three drives now, but in each case I've been able to get the tray back in, even though sometimes it has meant partially dismantling the drive, and it's worked fine ever since.

1 non-Intel CPU which fried within days when some software on my PC somehow put it into an internal infinite loop. I changed the motherboard and CPU for an Intel PIII. 1 RAM stick failure (later on in same PC - cause and effect?). 1 mismatched paired RAM from same dodgy supplier in the same order as above.
--
=========================================================
Please always reply to ng as the email in this post's
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

<snip>
Interested that you seem to dislike AsRock - care to expand further? I have an AsRock Z68 Extreme 4 Gen3
--
No plan survives contact with the enemy.
[Not even bunny]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/12/2012 18:23, David WE Roberts wrote:

Dislike would be way too strong... "Leaning toward others in preference" might be closer
(to be fair - the point I was making was that if you cut corners on motherboard quality you lower the overall system reliability even if the CPU is identical - and asrock was just the first name that came to mind in the slightly cheaper end of the market)
I have had a pretty good experience with boards by asus - and hence they are what I use in my own systems. Some of the others also offer good facilities / price points etc, and I would certainly consider them - asrock and MSI being examples. However IME they have not been quite as reliable. I used to like gigabyte years ago for the feature set etc, but got burned by rather too many failures and slightly suspect BIOS issues for my liking)
OOI, I just had a look through the dead mobo pile I have waiting for when I can be bothered to re-cap them - 3 MSI, one Acer, and one Biostar - no asrock there at the moment ;-) (the MSI ones I may repair since they have reasonably decent C2D E7600 CPUs and 4GB RAM - the others are probably not worth it)
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are they really worth the time re-capping these days?..
As duff caps are the main source of MB failures, but that factory I believe has either closed or they have now re instated the missing ingredient!...
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/12/2012 14:25, tony sayer wrote:

Not usually unless they are rare boards. I did some Ideq "cube" boards a while back since getting replacements that fit the SFF cases is very difficult.
Having said that, when you have the whole board with decent CPU and RAM etc, then it can be worth it for a cheap upgrade on older systems if you can recap them in 30 mins with a couple of quids worth of parts.

Well that is what I heard as well, but have still been getting cap failures on boards well after the time the dodgy ones were supposed to be out of the supply channel.
Not had any of the ones using so called "mil spec" metal can caps yet. (not sure if they really are Mil spec - but they certainly seem better than the normal radial electrolytics.
--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK..
That is a bit worrying are they duff made caps or just under rated ones?.
We have some real vintage machines around at some remote locations. They do very simple jobs just mail us id something plays up, years old are up for hours and perform as well as they day they were made.
Not one bulging or leaking cap to be seen..

Yes indeed...
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I replaced the dodgy Gigabyte P4 motherboard mentioned in my failures list down thread with an ASRock motherboard, and so far it's been excellent. I have no quibble with them at all. I've also noticed that they seem to command a higher used price on eBay that many other makes, which suggest that my good (so far) experience with them is shared by others.
On Thu, 20 Dec 2012 21:09:12 +0000, John Rumm

--
=========================================================
Please always reply to ng as the email in this post's
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't top post.
--
Today is Sweetmorn, the 64th day of The Aftermath in the YOLD 3178
Don't do business with Churchill Insurance - they're slime.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why not?
wrote:

--
No plan survives contact with the enemy.
[Not even bunny]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.