Making a corner desk

Dear all, I have been looking to buy a corner office desk but can't seem to find one the size I want so am wondering about making one. The dimensions I want are about 120cm x 160cm (or thereabouts, exactness isn't crucial) but the depth of the longest side needs to be 60 rather than the 80 they seem to come as. Because of the size I thought a piece of worktop would be ideal, joined in the usual kitchen way to make an L shape, but not sure how to do the legs. C or I metal legs would be fine for the ends, but the bit in the middle would be difficult, - can't have legs there or my own legs would be bruised, - Iwant the computer to go in the L shaped bit. In the shops desks have a strong metal frame to support the L or curve - is there another solution? Has anyone done this successfully? (If so, how much would you charge to make one for me?!!)
Thanks
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EN wrote:

I made a corner desk myself, using a metal frame which I had made for me by a local engineering firm (found through yellow pages). It's made from 0.75" steel square-section bar, and is massively strong.
In my case, the desk is built in to an alcove, and the back and long side of the worktop are supported by timber battens screwed to the wall, so just the front leg and top rail are made from steel. The free end of the top rail locates in, and is supported by, a notch cut in one of the battens.
I did a sketch of what I wanted fabricating in steel, then made up a rough timber mock-up, using a bit of scrap timber to brace the corner exactly at the correct angle - this was important because, living in an old house, most of my corners weren't exactly 90 degrees so the welded steel corners needed to be pretty precisely set up (you can't exactly bend them to fit later!)
I hawked this round the local industrial estates, and the first engineering firm I found was happy to take it on, and it certainly wasn't exhorbitantly expensive. Tenner IIRC?, for an L-shape (ie with one welded joint).
Good luck David
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My handyman simply used two lengths of 1" square steel tube set into battens on the wall at each end. Worked a treat and is still here after twelve years. Cheap quick and easy.
Peter Crosland
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EN formulated the question :

If you intend to work in the corner of the L, then it might be better to make it from three sections of worktop, such that the one in the corner is at 45deg.
A couple of small filling cabinets, one either end can be used for supporting the worktop.
--

Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Do you really want it L-shaped? If you use your worktop *diagonally* across the corner, not only can you support it in places where it won't interfere with your legs, but you will also have additional useful depth where you need it.
[Have a look at
http://www.mills37.plus.com/desk.JPG to see what I mean. I did this when adapting some bedroom furniture to make a study for SWMBO].
--
Cheers,
Set Square
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Think "outside the box" - forget right angles, go triangular.
http://www.jarkman.co.uk/catalog/furnitur/aerofoildesk.htm
Corner desks are easy if you wall mount them. Support from two perpendicular walls means that you can have a top that would be far too flimsy for free-standing use, yet it's rigid enough here to make a good desk. Fewer parts and simple to make too.
Curving the front edge of an overall triangle also makes for good ergonomics and something that definitely wasn't bought from Ikea.
The one on the picture is 1/2" MDF top, a few steel brackets and a piece of steel box tube just behind the front edge. You can make it witth a jigsaw and hand tools at minimum, although that one used a welder, router and biscuit jointer too.
If you'd prefer it made for you, and you're in sensible delivery range of Bristol, drop me an email.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Thank you all for the speedy replies, and what beautiful desks in the pics.
I should've explained better that I want to be able to move easily between the bit in the corner that supports the pc to the longer side to use it as a writing surface so having the corner supported on a cupboard etc wouldn't work. I'd be constantly moving my chair in and out. I'll investigate the metal frame suggestions further though, it looks as though this is going to work out cheaper than expected though, so thanks for all the help.
Elizabeth
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Spur shelving do a large wall bracket that will support a corner table,If I remember I used 5 x 600mm brackets, the top was made from veneered mdf I think 20mm it was designed for a reception area ,and the free movement of legs under the table was paramount to the design,I had the top done at a local joinery shop.Worked brilliantly
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