Low Co2al

Picked up a couple of bags of coal the other day. When I got it home I found
it wasn't the normal lumps of House Coal but some kind of processed
briquette labelled Low Co2al - "A Modern House Coal with 20% less CO2" it
said on the bag.
That makes zero sense to me. I asked my son with half an A-level and he said
it was nonsense. What can it mean?
Tim W
Reply to
Tim W
If it is a smokeless processed type of coal, then I suppose it might mean they have used less energy in the production of it than would normally be the case...
Reply to
John Rumm
It could mean it's got hydrocarbons in, which will give a little less CO2 per weight burned, and could possibly give 20% less CO2 per unit energy given out.
Reply to
Clive George
Much of ordinary coal is already hydrocarbon I'd go for some bright spark substituting part of the coal content for cheap silica either as fly ash or sand in the briquettes
Bullshit Baffles Brains
Reply to
cynic
not nonsense at all, I expect it simply means there is 20% less fuel content in it per kilo or per volume, so you get 20% less heat energy out.
NT
Reply to
Tabby
not nonsense at all, I expect it simply means there is 20% less fuel content in it per kilo or per volume, so you get 20% less heat energy out.
------------
It has to be that doesn't it? Less CO2 means less hydrocarbons means less heat. A more careful look at the bag reveals "30% renewables" so it must be a blend of coal and some other wood or vegetable waste and giving out less heat per kilo than pure coal. Oh well.
Tim W
Reply to
Tim W
Not necessarily. If it's mix of sawdust or similar and coaldust, the wood has a net CO2 output per unit of heat much lower than the coal.
It could still give out almost the same amount of heat per kilogramme as coal, and at the same time generate less net CO2.
Tciao for Now!
John.
Reply to
John Williamson
Perhaps they don't count the CO2 emitted from the renewable element reasoning that it has already been accounted for.
Reply to
Andrew May
does use 170W less) it might not be a bad thing. I wonder how easy 330W bubbles are to come by and what the price is compared to 500 or 150W ones?
But why do people want such high lighting levels in their back garden or worse have fittings that allow light to escape above the horizontal?
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
In message , Dave Liquorice writes
Too right! Usually down to the fitter working in daylight. Maybe the reflector casing should have a visible guide line to help initial set up? I thought there was some impending legislation but that seems to have gone away with our departed deputy prime minister.
Try night tractor driving, with a dusty windscreen, anything up to a mile from these excrescence's.
regards
Reply to
Tim Lamb
Or even driving along a village street with some PIR courtesy/security lights facing traffic :-(
Reply to
cynic
In article , snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com says...
Bugs the hell out of me. The gardens round here aren't large - a few meters long. Someone nearby has a 500W lamp that isn't actually that badly aimed, but you can still tell at night when it comes on.
We have a 150W lamp that we use for when we actually want the garden lit up (it's not on a PIR or timer, it's not even screwed to anything, it just clamps to a beam in the car-port and shines down the garden) and that's more than adequate.
Reply to
Skipweasel
According to the marketing blurb, it means that the manufactured fuel contains 30% biomass. The argument being that the overall CO2 output is lower than pure fossil fuel because growing the plants for the biomass absorbs CO2.
Colin Bignell
Reply to
Nightjar

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