LG Smart TV and External HDD

On 26/10/2018 07:34, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

I use a SSD with my LG telly. Yes it records all the time you are watching live TV in case you want to wind back.
Mike
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On Fri, 26 Oct 2018 07:34:52 +0100, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Little tip: get a cheap USB hub, plug that into the TV (once) and then plug your devices into the hub (also works for PCs in general).
WRT to the HDD ... we use both an HDD and memory sticks (that hub is already paying for itself). Never had any issues - but then any *writing* is done off-TV.
FWIW our hub has a little "on/off" switch, which means that when you aren't using the HDD, you can simply switch it out of the circuit. Which means when you do want to use it you switch it in, which seems to wake it up anyway.
Really, I'd like to dispense with all that malarkey, and simply stream over WiFi. But for some reason it struggles with very big HD files. (Not for the first time do I curse not having the foresight to cable the house up when the heating engineer had all the boards up.)
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Jethro_uk laid this down on his screen :

I cabled the place up with coax LAN, TV antennas piped all round and phone sockets in the mid 80's, then in the 90's replaced the LAN coax with RJ45/CAT5 to most places, plus wifi filling in the gaps.
What ever you do, it will be out of date tomorrow.
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On Fri, 26 Oct 2018 10:35:31 +0100, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

(goes green ...)
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On 26/10/2018 13:06, Jethro_uk wrote:

My experience of wifi and powernet shite is that NOTHING is as reliable or as fast as 100Mbps cat5, or indeed gigabit if you have it.
I can stream some videos over wifi - allegedly 65Mbps - but it stutters on HD sometimes.
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On Fri, 26 Oct 2018 13:14:50 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Pretty much my experience.
It's one of those cases where the stats *look* good, but the reality just doesn't bear it out.
I might end up running a cable through the loft ....
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On 26/10/2018 07:34, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Are you sure that on live TV the disk isn't being used for timeshift? Timeshift is the ability to pause and scroll back, say, a couple of hours of the programme/channel you are watching. To scroll back a couple of hours of live TV the channel you are watching has to be recorded in a (circular) buffer on the hard disk. In this mode the disk will always be used for recording.
In IPTV mode I would assume that the disk is being used a temporary buffer storing data as it arrives and then reading it back out at a slower rate. Perhaps local timeshift is also being applied to IPTV data.
A disk that is constantly being used for timeshift functions cannot go into standby.
On my STB timeshift operates in two optional ways. i) the hard disk is only used for recording when the pause key is operated and subsequent viewing of the delayed programme This means when not in use it can go to sleep. The disadvantage with this mode of operation is with live TV you cannot scroll back before the time when you pressed the pause button. ii) the disk is always being used to record what you are watching. This means you can pause a programme and then immediately scroll back a minute or perhaps a few hours of the live broadcast. Usually this recording is limited to a few hours with the most historic stuff getting constantly over-written. This recording buffer is usually cleared/reset when changing channels
LG may call timeshift "time machine"
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alan_m submitted this idea :

I am not sure at the moment of anything at all. The set came new, but with no instructions. I managed to download 'some' instructions from the LG site, but they seem to only cover the remote buttons and the use of a serial data connection to the unit. Nothing detailed for the normal user, or the spec..
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On 26/10/2018 13:29, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

You will probably find it has help built in as one of the preloaded applications when you push the home button.
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John Rumm expressed precisely :

Oh, it has, in the form of pop-ups, but very brief none tech. information.
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On 26/10/2018 19:18, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

On mine there is also a quite detailed manual. If you bring up the multi coloured stripe at the bottom of the screen:
vis [1]:
https://www.cnet.com/news/lg-to-show-off-webos-2-0-smart-tv-at-ces-2015/
Scroll along the list, and one should be the full manual... (ISTR its orange on mine)
[1] Yes I know its an old page, but I just wanted an image of the menu, and that one came up on the search with a more attractive screen "border" than many ;-)
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John Rumm formulated the question :

Thanks, yes found it at last - its the same in WebOS 3.5
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If your set supports instant record, then it has to run all the time as spinning up and finding its fat etc will take time. As for sticks. I feel that is poppycock unless you are very unlucky. We use sticks on a weekly turn around at our talking newspaper and they seem none the worse for it at all. Most failures are mechanical, like user or post office mishandling with size 9 boots.
I think you may find 4 gig is about the smallest that you need for that tv Lots around very much larger than that of course and not that expensive.
Brian
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It happens that Brian Gaff formulated :

A weekly rewriting is a lot different to a constant rewrite that would be the case in a TV.
Having said that, I have a stick in a raspberry pi which I am using as a weather server, which is being constantly written to. This it has been doing since mid-summer.
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On Fri, 26 Oct 2018 11:19:49 +0100, Brian Gaff wrote:

Hence the advice to use a USB hub to protect the TVs connector ...
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Not enough time to matter.

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On Friday, 26 October 2018 07:34:56 UTC+1, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

I have a 43" Smart LG and have used USB sticks I';m not sire if I tried a sub 1GB.

I had a problem with an external HDD, it was unrelaible I think due to using the TV to power it, I tried external power and it was a bit more relible but not much. After finding out I couldn;t record some channels to USB I haven;t found a use to use it in recroded mode but do use it to watch things using a SD card in a USB adapter.

Perhaps they HDD needs to access itself evey so often.
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On 26/10/2018 07:34, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

I tend to use USB sticks, HDDs can require more power than I'm convinced the USB ports in our TVs (at least some of them) are designed for.
As a rough guide, allow 1G/hr on record so, even a modest 32G stick will hold a far bit.
We have an older LG which doesn't record but other TVs which do. Some use the ts extension from memory but, if you charge it to mp4, you can play the files on a PC or other TV. The other TV uses a file system (not just file extension) I can't identify.
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On 26/10/2018 16:35, Brian Reay wrote:

More like 2G/hr for HD. For instance, recordings of Dr Who on BBC1 HD range in size from 1.4G to 2.4G bytes
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On 26/10/2018 19:23, alan_m wrote:

It does seem to vary a bit IME, but its probably not a bad figure to use for estimating storage requirements. The .ts recordings for the last three episodes from my setup are coming in at between 1.2, and 1.6 GB
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