Ladder stand-offs - worthwhile?

On 24/02/2016 13:48, Roger Mills wrote:

+1 I've often tied a length of wood to it when working above windows so I can still rest on the masonry
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On Wed, 24 Feb 2016 09:45:35 +0000, no_spam wrote:

off/738-1604.prd

Stay.html.

Just to add - one thing I like about standoffs is that you can attach them about 2/3 up the top half of a two piece ladder and then when you are at gutter height there is still some ladder above you which you can hold on to.
I do not like standing near the top of the ladder which is tucked under the guttering and working "freestyle" on the guttering with nothing substantial to hold onto.
Cheers
Dave R
--
Windows 8.1 on PCSpecialist box

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On 24/02/2016 09:45, no snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

Thanks to all - I was tempted to buy a cheapie and add a sheet of aluminium to make a tray but have ordered one of these: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/291244932663 .
Having looked around at feet, the rubber pads seem to ne a little controversial so I think for soft surfaces I'll make a cleated board to spread the load and stake it to the ground.
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On 24/02/2016 17:29, no snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

It was dumped on the doorstep yesterday by Hermes - fortunately it's a low crime area, but at least they put a card through the letterbox to say they'd left it on the doorstep !!. It seems much more solid than others I've seen, with the parts welded together rather than being bent, but that means it's probably a little heavier. Now all I need is the right round tuit.
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I'm 69 and still climbing ladders without mishap. As a child it was my job to pick fruit from trees. Invariably at some point the ladder would settle into the tree to the accompaniment of my fathers voice from below "keep hol d of the ladder it can't fall through the tree because the branches get thi cker as you go". I've never used movable feet, preferring the solid feel of the end of the stiles on the ground. Stand offs are useful additions but i f you are only going to use occasionally think about hiring the item. Also consider zip up scaffold for ease of working.
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no snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com scribbled

I saw a prat repairing a 1st floor window today. He was up a ladder that was on concrete - no feet on it. When he told he should have someone holding the bottom of the ladder he replied "If I drop anything, the lad holding the ladder could get hurt"
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On 24/02/2016 21:23, Jonno wrote:

So you can't go up a ladder on your own any more? Ridiculous
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No - you need to do a Risk Assessment.
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from KT24 in Surrey, England

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On 24/02/2016 21:23, Jonno wrote:

A ladder at the correct angle isn't going to slip on a concrete floor unless you grease it.
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