Interesting approach to tiling?!

wrote:

What else is he supposed to do? He's done the only practical option.
NT
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If he was a cowboy the tiles would be wonky. That's all there is to that.
I had a similar problem years ago when the Abergele cowboy I was working for gave up and left me twit. Since the people were lovely I stayed on and coped. I had a trial and error period which was nasty and painfull until I got to the bit that was highest out of true and then just went back and made the pieces fit.
It turned into a nice enough job after that and when they came in and admired it, that put the plate on the door as far as I was concerned.
He had told them their walls were leaking and had them spend a fortune trying to fix what was more likely a chimney tar problem and finally after I built a gate pillar that he'd also given up on, he came back in the night and wrecked it. The spitefull, little man.
I bet he is still in business. And giving customers an hard time when he realises he has bitten off more than he can wrangle his little spurs out of.
.....
Effing cheek on the OP complaining about the way he "prepared" the wall. I'd have told him to stuff it if he said anything about that. Ripped the tiles off and gone home, too.
If the man sees what the ploker wrote about him here I would bet on the plumbing giving trouble in the not too distant...
It would be a serve him rite.
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Do you honestly think tradespeople read a d-i-y newsgroup?
What you suggest sounds like criminal damage to me. Two years inside for that. What sound advice you give!
Still, Google Groups suggests its typical of your contributions here - what a bitter excuse for a pro you must be, popping into a DIY newsgroup to try to wind up the amateurs. Sadly, I've only ever found a minority of "professionals" to have the breadth and depth of knowledge that can be found on the internet.
Cheers, David.
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The work required to line up screw holes in tiles with those pre-existing would be horrendous. You drill the holes after fitting the tiles.
--
*Sticks and stones may break my bones but whips and chains excite me*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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I managed it to within 1/2 a mm in the other bathroom, and this was my first attempt.
It seemed quite an obvious thing to do, given the nuisance of drilling through porcelain tiles vertical on a wall, vs drilling through them when horizontal laying on a floor or workbench. Easier to keep wet. Gravity acting in a useful direction. Resulting dirt only has to be cleaned off one tile. No real problem if the drill bit slips or the tile cracks - just use another tile. etc.
Maybe it was beyond this tiler though - he's cut 28mm holes for the 15mm pipes, and some of those still catch the edge of the hole!
Cheers, David.
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Fine - but I still say it's not worth the bother. Just drill new holes complete. The chances are you might want to align the fitting with the tiles anyway - so it won't be in exactly the same place as before.
--
*Why is "abbreviated" such a long word?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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1/2 a mil out on the tile ......and half a mile out on the wall.
I am glad it wasn't me. The dunce. I bet he's got packers under some of the gubbins.
Not being a plumber I'd have said: "Why not just slap a sheet of gyproc up first and put a piece of ply or thick layer of adhesive under where any fixing will go?" And make a cup of tea while I was waiting for the tosser to make up his mind. All at substantial, non cow-poke dollars a day, too neither.
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At the risk of flogging a dead horse, my approach was: mark wall, mark tile, drill tile, drill wall, fix tile.
It couldn't be easier. I've tried it the other way around. It's do- able, but wetting the drill bit is a faff, and there's more clearing up afterwards.
Obviously I'll be drilling new holes complete _now_ :-).
Cheers, David.
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Fine for one hole - but say 8 for a towel rail? And why drill the hole in the wall before fixing the tile?

Drilling hard tiles is never easy. But not too bad with a diamond core drill. You just keep dipping it in a cup of water.

--
*If God dropped acid, would he see people?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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You don't _have_ to - that part doesn't really matter - though it let me put the wall plug straight into the wall, rather than through the tile. Would have been helpful in this case. Also lets you put a larger hole in the tile than the wall (e.g. when drilling through tile + plasterboard into battens) without risking the larger drill bit going into the front of the batten too when it breaks through.

...about every 5 seconds last night!
Anyway, just wanted to thank you for saying you always dot-n-dab tiles - that gave me the confidence to get on with this without worrying about smashing the tiles. All holes drilled without incident. (though I still think it's far easier drilling them on the workbench or floor!).
Amazed at the strength of the tiles when drilling, I hit a tile offcut with a hammer, and found I couldn't smash it unless I propped it up at a 45 degree angle. They're really very tough, so it seems dot-n-dab won't cause any problems at all in this case.
Sorry to worry the group over nothing - but we're all first timers at everything once!
I think in the future, I'd consider doing the same with slightly wonky walls. Strong (and in this case, cheap!) tiles + dot-n-dab might be the way to go.
Cheers, David.
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