Insulating a cold room

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On Friday, November 2, 2012 11:02:02 AM UTC, codek wrote:

You've insulated the loft. Presumably the room below is heated so no loss there. That leaves windows, draughts and walls.
Windows: Usually the biggest loss. Adding a 3rd layer in framed glass, acrylic or plastic film would reduce losses.
Walls: I'm not clear how you can know it has no cavity without knowing what material is used. Options are: 1. CWI is the best option if it does turn out to have a cavity 2. Exterior insulation under render is the next best bet if already rendered 3. Interior insulation board is the last option, typically used where exterior character rules out render. PIR board then plasterboard is cheaper, but wastes half an inch depth. Hard faced PIR board costs more but doesn't waste any space.
There are other options occasionally used, but those are the 3 to look at.
NT
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On Nov 2, 7:06 pm, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

I think the OP needs to take on board what has been said here but also consider quite why this room, with its two external walls, is so cold. If it is any normal house then nearly all the larger rooms will have two external walls !! There must be other rooms in the house that are similarly configured so there must be some specific reason why he considers this room worse than the others, and see if he can address that.
Rob
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On Sat, 3 Nov 2012 10:52:34 -0700 (PDT), robgraham wrote:

Not in a "traditional semi" the larger rooms share the party wall one side and internal walls the other side and room rear. They only have one external wall. The corner rooms(*), do have two external walls and are colder. I should know my childhood bedroom was the small corner bedroom in a 1930's semi...
(*) Normally hall way/stairs and kitchen downstairs, bathroom and small bedroom upstairs.
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robgraham wrote:

I don't know if it applies to the OP, but north facing rooms are often colder than south facing ones. Short of rebuilding the whole house on an enormous turntable, there's not a lot you can do to address that....
(Actually I have wondered about heat pipes between a couple of our rooms. It makes no sense that they are on the same underfloor heating zone, but changing that means ripping up more floor than I want to....)
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