How to insert blade in a Makita 4329 jigsaw?

I bought a new Makita jigsaw recently, but only now got around to using it. It's an orbital jigsaw. The "scotch yoke" plunger-with-roller (the bit that moves up and down) is sprung loaded. This is probably to do with the orbital action, if invoked.
When you insert the jigsaw blade, ensuring the blade fits in the roller groove, you can push against the edge of the blade (forward to aft direction) and the yoke/roller assy moves against the spring. Release the blade and it springs forward again, maintaining good contact with the blade's rear edge.
Now, what is the correct way of putting in the blade? Should the blade be just lightly resting against the roller (A)? Or should it be very slightly tensioned against it (by the sprung-loaded mechanism) (B)?
Reason I ask is, if I insert it as in (A), the blade wanders to the left like crazy, even when I use a fence. When I adopt (B), it doesn't. It cuts a nice, straight line. I'm using genuine Makita B 10 saw blades.
MM
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Never heard the term "orbital" for a jigsaw, but i have a Makita with pendu lum action and what sounds like the same blade fitting arrangement. The bla de is held snug against the roller, but not with great force.
A fence with a jigsaw is a nightmare and i would never use one. The blades are flexible and so if you force a straight line cut with a fence, the cut may remain straight on the upper surface, but the blade will tend to depart from perpendicular to the surface (i.e. a slanted cut). This doesn't happe n during freehand cutting because you are constantly correcting the cut dir ection (i.e. hunting, albeit within a very narrow range of movement, if you 're good at it), rather than forcing it.
A jigsaw is not a tool for cutting a perfect straight edge. It is for curve d and awkward shapes, or for making an approximate straight cut (can be mad e perfect using a router or other tool, afterwards).
Terry.
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On Mon, 13 Mar 2017 01:43:32 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Makita refers to it as an orbital jigsaw, but, yes, it's equivalent to pendulum action, as far as I can tell. This is the first jigsaw I've bought with this "feature". (Actually, it's only the 2nd jigsaw I've ever bought.) Maybe Makita chose "orbital", as it's a term more DIYers would recognise than "pendulum".

Okay, but with my previous AEG (as mentioned, it was 40 years old) a guide or fence worked very well and blade deviation was minimal.

With freehand cutting one just needs lots of practice, I suppose...

Yes, I'm amazed about that, having read the same statement all over the web. I have only ever owned a jigsaw, never a circular saw, so apart from handsaws, the jigsaw is all I have (although I'd quite like a bandsaw, but can't justify the cost). Maybe I was spoilt by the excellent AEG non-"orbital" jigsaw I bought in West Germany in the 1970s.

Something I never need to do!!

That neither. I only want straight cuts in plywood or MDF. If I'm sawing, say, a real wood floor board or similar, I use the handsaw.
MM
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Can you switch off the pendulum action? You can on mine, and that gives a straighter cut. Slower, but better for a (nearly) straight line.

A decent circular saw can give very accurate cuts. Most tend to get one of those before a jigsaw.
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On 13/03/2017 14:43, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

According to then manual, it has a selection for 4 off cutting actions.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Pendulum perhaps?
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On 13/03/2017 08:43, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

yup fences can be a mixed blessing on thicker cuts.

To be fair the better Makita / blue Bosch versions of them can cut a pretty refined straight line if yo need them to.
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John.
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I think that the main issues with straight jigsaw cuts, using a fence, are threefold:
1) tool quality The *worst* jigsaw i ever had was a B&D "scrolling" jigsaw, where the rotat ional slop meant that you simply could not cut a straight line. I ruined mo re wood with that thing than I care to recall (some bloody minded determina tion to persevere with it, for years).
2) blade flex/substrate density variation Straight, perpendicular cuts in man made materials that are uniform density /hardness throughout seems to be more achievable than for natural wood, whi ch has knots and grain pattern that tend to re-direct a flexible blade and if the machine is fence-guided, it causes non-perpendicular cutting.
3. Substrate thickness The thicker, the greater the effects of 1 and 2 on the cut.
Circ saws and routers are wonderful things.
Anyone used one of those mini circ saws that seem to be all the rage these days? Any good?
Terry
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On Mon, 13 Mar 2017 09:54:12 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I was looking at one of those in Wickes this afternoon! £69, a Worx tool. Screwfix do a similar product called Titan at £15 cheaper. I looked at the Bosch one online, but it only has a 40mm blade and the depth of cut is only 16mm. The Worx is 27mm.
MM
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On 13/03/2017 07:17, MM wrote:

With many of the Makita jigsaws they employ a quick change blade system where you simply push a leaver to the side, insert the blade and let got - it then snaps into the right place every time. Looking at the pictures of yours, I am guessing this is not a tool free blade change?
The blade should be sprung against the restraint - such that as the blade orbits / swings it remains in contact with the blade support at all times.
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On Mon, 13 Mar 2017 16:04:14 +0000, John Rumm

No, it has an Allen screw. I prefer it. That's what the AEG had.

Aha! Now that pretty much confirms what I've found in practice. What I did was pull back the sprung roller/blade holder *very slightly*, then insert the blade absolutely perpendicular and tighten the Allen screw, then release the roller. Then I get a very good cut. Otherwise, not.
MM
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I suppose if you only generally use one blade, an allen key type is OK. But if changing often, a tool less one is great.
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On 13/03/2017 19:18, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Yup, love the blade change on mine - quick, easy, and gets it located spot on every time.
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John.
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