How can I repair the turntable floor in a microwave oven?



Sorry, but that's an immediate PAT test failure because of microwave leakage. You need to render it unusable (cut the mains cord off right up against where it enters the case) and dispose of it. Repairing it safely and correctly would be much more expensive than a replacement.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On 16 Jun 2007 16:51:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Okay, okay, hofficer! I'll come clean! Look, no guns! No, that's just a table leg! I was trying to render the microwave unusable. ID card? DNA sample? What else do you need? Oh, my fingerprints. Right-o.
MM
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replying to MM, John A Knight wrote: http://www.scienceabc.com/pure-sciences/what-will-happen-if-your-microwave-oven-develops-a-hole-in-it-will-the-waves-leak.html
I know this is a very dated post, however I'd like to post a more constructive reply.
Q: how to "*/_repair_/*" a hole in a microwave oven?
The internet is a network of information, unfortunately we did not find it here, I will continue my research into this topic, I will update my reply when I have a tried and tested repair method(s), ***for now, for all of us who share this problem I recommend following the warning signs on the kitchen appliance (do not place mental or foods that increase in pressure has they cook ect.) if the hole in the microwave oven is bigger then 2 inches for your safety I recommend */_not_/* using the microwave oven, if the hole is 2 inches or smaller I recommend keeping it isolated (away from anything that's a fire hazard), putting it in a clay or dish tray and leaving the kitchen while your meal is prepared.***
This is just my opinion and I do not wish to impose it on to anyone, it's easy to through money at problem rather then maintain it, I believe there's no harm in trying to be self-sufficient and acquire a new skill.
I hope this helps everyone a bit.
Thank you for the thread MM.
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On Thursday, 19 May 2016 17:44:04 UTC+1, John A Knight wrote:

That site's info re hole size & leakage is complete ballcocks.

What a surprise.
NT
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On Thu, 19 May 2016 10:04:14 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/uk.d-i-y/K3tfG7QZKMI/WSBDBrNF0GkJ
Clearly the OP needed to buy a new microwave, but from an RF perspective the information on that scienceabc.com page is actually quite accurate.
--

Graham.

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On Thu, 19 May 2016 18:24:00 +0100, Graham.

I thought it was complete bollocks too; it treats microwaves as if they're tennis balls, but I'm no microwave expert. If it's not bollocks, and if microwaves can't leak out of a hole smaller than 12 cm. why all the fuss in the past about microwaves leaking around ill-fitting doors, and why the need for a fine mesh across the window in the door? If the article is OK, you barely need to shut the door, let alone worry about leaks around the edge, and wide-mesh netting would do in the window allowing a much better view of the contents. What am I not understanding?
--

Chris

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This issue is nothing specifically to do with microwaves. It relates to *all* sorts of waves and their behaviour. Look up diffraction. I'd do it meself, but SWMBO has just announced that the scoff is ready.
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On Thu, 19 May 2016 19:37:48 +0100, Tim Streater

OK. I know a little about diffraction (A-level physics circa 1962 but not a lot since), but I looked it up on Wiki anyway. It says, amongst other things, that diffraction is most pronounced when the width of the slit or aperture matches the wavelength of the radiation, which is the situation in this case. But the aperture doesn't block the radiation completely. You just get a pattern beyond the aperture of alternating destructive and constructive interference, either side of the main beam. I wouldn't want my kidneys positioned either in the main beam or at a point of constructive interference, while watching my supper cooking. And it doesn't answer my point about gaps around the door, or the screen mesh across the window.
--

Chris

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On 19/05/16 19:37, Tim Streater wrote:

The issue us not diffraction, but reflection.
You don't need a perfect surface to reflect.
Its the same principle as using a yagi array or similar. The presence of the metal bits affects propagation around a far greater volume than they physically occupy, because a field is induced in the nearby areas.
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Chris was asking why you couldn't just use wide-mesh netting. I'm saying that considerable energy can diffract through that (apparently), even if the mesh size is less than the wavelength.
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On 20/05/16 11:23, Tim Streater wrote:

Its the same issue as a half silvered mirror.
It doesn't reflect 100%. Diffraction is not really relevant.
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On Fri, 20 May 2016 11:23:09 +0100, Tim Streater

If considerable energy can diffract or otherwise pass through wide mesh netting, and I don't doubt it for a minute, how can a bloody great hole 12cm across not be a major hazard, as the article linked to at the top of this thread said wasn't? (hope I've not got double negatives there, but YSWIM!)
--

Chris

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On 20/05/16 14:13, Chris Hogg wrote:

well 2GHZ is around 3.75cm for a quarter wave..
so its of the order of a wavelength anyway.
I am fairly sure that diffraction is a bit of a red herring though.
Its one of those lectures I probably didnt pay much attention to, but I think its a matter of reflection.
You can build a radar reflector adequately out of chicken wire..
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A narrow slot several centimetres in length as in an ill fitting door would leak energy of the appropriate polarisation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slot_antenna
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Graham.

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On Thu, 19 May 2016 20:57:19 +0100, Graham.

OK, that makes sense. Now what about the mesh in the door?
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I found this:
<http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/95143/can-we-observe-diffrac tion-even-if-the-slit-size-is-tending-to-zero>
I guess the implication is that although the wavelength is a few cm, the mesh has to have small holes to sufficiently reduce the radiation that would diffract through the holes.
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On Thu, 19 May 2016 21:29:06 +0100, Chris Hogg wrote:

microwave-oven-develops-a-hole-in-it-will-the-waves-leak.html

As anyone who has ever tried to make an RF-tight screening box will know, the problem of totally confining the RF energy bouncing around the innards of such an enclosure so as to eliminate unwanted interference to other kit or other modules within the apparatus is not quite so simple to solve as it may appear to the uninitiated (I had quite a laugh at the EMC 'measures' being introduced in the construction of personal desktop computer cases nearly two decades ago).
Whilst a screening mesh with a hole (or a few holes) less than a wavelength in diameter makes a reasonably effective screen, it's not perfect, merely 'perfect enough as makes no difference' in practice.
Such a screen won't totally stop such radiation passing through, it merely attenuates it to a much lower level (maybe 40 to 60db per sub- wavelength hole?). This is usually more than enough when the waves only get one chance to pass through the screening mesh. However, in the case of the cooking cavity, they'll get hundreds, if not thousands of attempts at leaking out as they bounce around the low loss cavity.
The food will absorb most of this energy... eventually but there will be eigentone pathways not obstructed by the food where the levels of radiation will be magnified hundreds to thousands of times the average level in the cavity. Quarter wavelength diameter holes in the viewing screen mesh won't offer sufficient attenuation, halving the diameter of these holes will require a quadrupling of said holes which counters the improvement in screening to some extent, hence the *very* small size compared to the wavelength involved to sufficiently attenuate radiation leakage to below a level deemed to be acceptably safe.
The smaller the holes, the better and the most likely reason for their extremely small size is probably more to do with the lowest size possible without offering too much obstruction to viewing the contents rather than a maximum allowable size to contain the microwave leakage to an acceptable minimum.
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On Thursday, 19 May 2016 18:24:06 UTC+1, Graham. wrote:

The notion that there will be no leakage if a hole is 1% less than the wavelength is quite accurate?
NT
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The issue of holes in Microwaves does beg the question how did the hole get there in the first place of course. I stand by my method. I assume one can still buy those microwave leak detectors. The most likely place for the microwaves to leak is at the door bottom which tends to rust away.
Short term, ie ten seconds or less exposure is not going to do you much harm as you measure the leakage. Remember its a party trick in radar labs to heat up your sandwhiches using the open end of a waveguide when it is connected to a magnetron. :-) Brian
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On 19/05/16 17:44, John A Knight wrote:

http://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy/how-can-i-repair-the-turntable-floor-in-a-microwave-oven-401941-.htm
Fuck off homeownershub.com
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