Granite worktops - stain problems between different varieties/colours

I've done a trawl of the archives but couldn't find a satisfactory
answer. Google Groups doesn't improve with each version, I find.
We're in the process of having a new kitchen installed. The worktop
people came today and created the template for the granite surface.
However, they tell us that the variety we've chosen (a pale golden
brown mottled stone called Giallo Veneziano) may not be suitable owing
to the number of fissures, and recommend a different variety: they
seem to be pushing us towards one called Baltic Brown. We had a dark
granite at our last house and found it hard to keep clean which is why
we are veering towards the Giallo.
I've looked at samples of both in the light and can't seen any
difference in the surface texture - both have some fissuring. Can't
they be sealed against things like red wine? The fitters tell us that
if we choose it we'll have to apply beeswax monthly. It's not exactly
a chore, but is it possible that they're just trying to shift a
backlog of Baltic Brown?
Thanks
Edward
Reply to
teddysnips
On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 10:13:02 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:
We've recently ( 2 Xmas's ago) got granite worktops, "Baltic Brown" was AIRI *the cheapest one".
What we chose and ended up with was the very familiar blue one called which was about the dearest.
However Granite has got much cheaper over the last few years so the Granite for the whole kitchen including 10 metres of 600mm worktops & splashbacks up to the wall units was Ca 3.6k, templated and fitted. It would have been quite a bit cheaper if we hadn't had a breakfast bar which exceeded 600mm.
So make sure the price you've got is up to date and competitive.
We've done nothing exceptional with it by way of cleaning or applying surface treatments except in one area where we left a supermarket carrier bag on the surface for a week or so and when we moved it the printed Logo remained. It came off easily with solvents.
It is an exceptionally good material for a worksurface, completely natural and stable, and not petroleum-derived.
The only thing is sharp knives will score it, so if you have kids (even into their 20's and 30's), they must be warned off. OTOH, All laminate products wear through to the printed pattern in a few years which then disappears, the latest modern ones are thinner than paper.
8-[[
HTH
DG
Reply to
Derek Geldard
We had Giallo Venezinio or whatever it's called. and yes, it does have surface "defects" (?) the installer told me to polish it monthly with "pledge" or whatever however...... I took the advice of someone else here and sealed the whole lot using a product called "stain stop" by Lithofin.
Applied immediately and EXACTLY as per directions.... I also bought a tub of their "Polish Cream" for occasional maintenance. (And Litho Clean to be used before polish)
No stains in 3 years of red wine dribbles and spillages. Stain stop is claimed to have an effective application life of 7(?) years IIRC
Cost a few quid initially but it's a bloody brilliant range of products and It's lasted all this time without need for re-purchase. Oh, and the worktop looks as stunning today as it did when we chose it. (when I can be arsed to polish it up)
Granite is NOT Marble. But initial sealing with Lithofin sutff is thoroughly recommended. Just make sure you follow the directions TO THE LETTER because if you let it (Stain stop) "go off" without removing the excess you could make a costly mistake as somone else on here found out!
Cheers Pete --
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- gym equipment & Stuff
Reply to
gymratz
Thanks to you and Derek for your responses. We're going to go for the Giallo and get in a good supply of Stain Stop, but I'll see if I can find the thread where it might be a costly mistake.
Edward
Reply to
teddysnips
You don't need a very big tin of stain-stop it' very thin an spread easily. Just like paint thinners (smells as strong too)!
You do an area that you can remove the excess within 2 minutes of application (I think it's 2 minutes may be 5).
The problems occur if you don't remove the excess within the time stated as it goes off hard like resin I believe and can't be removed with solvent or scraper.
As long as you are aware of this it's no problem at all. I think I did ours in the 3 sections of worktop - 1 section at a time without any difficulties so each area was a maximum of about 2m sq.
Worktop doesn't get any of the love and affection it used to these days though we are still extra careful with the Indian take-aways.
:¬)
Cheers Pete
Reply to
gymratz
This is one where it is very advisable to wear a protective mask able to handle solvent vapours.
It's 15 when used on granite.
It can be removed with more of the MN Stain Stop within 24hrs
Reply to
Andy Hall
I stand corrected. It was a while ago I did it. Perhaps I was being a little paranoid for fear of messing up several grands worth of rather heavy slabs of stone.
:¬) Cheers Pete
Reply to
gymratz
There appears to be a water based version of Stain-Stop with very different application instructions and a shorter life. Anyone used it ?
Reply to
robert
I don't believe it will. Don't remember who it was on here that let it go off without removing the excess but IIRC I suggested using more of the product to remove the dried stuff and it was no good.
Th person in question also contacted Lithofin and they had no idea how excess could be removed once it had cured.
...... Just found the thread
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that helps.
Pete --
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- Gm Equipment & Fitness Equipment
Reply to
gymratz
It does work with thinners because I have done it, although that was within 24hrs. For under about an hour, use of more of the product will work.
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Reply to
Andy Hall
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Plenty of coatings don't respond to their original solvent once they're dry (ordinary oil paint for example). Any solvent based paint stripper (Nitromors etc) should dissolve the film, but you need to be mighty careful not to get it on anything else in the vicinity (including taps).
I'd try and get a "thin" version of the stripper. Wood finishing trade places usually do a "polish and lacquer removal" version which contains less of the starch used to thicken the paint removal type. The danger here is that the starch may soak into the granite and give you a cloudy haze.
Brush it on and remove with steel wool is the usual method. Don't know how this would affect the granite's appearance
Reply to
Stuart Noble
Thank you one and all. I have a breathing mask from my decorating days when I used a lot of scumble glaze, and a stop watch, so with luck and a following wind we should be ok.
Edward
Reply to
teddysnips

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