Glueing my wall back together

Hi,
I have a wall which is ordinary bricks topped with a course of black/ blue, shiny ones (I know they have a proper name, but I can't remember it). A couple of the black shiny ones are now loose - the mortar bed that they sit on is still there, they're just no longer stuck to it. Is there some sort of resin-based stuff that I can use to glue things back together (araldite?) rather than having to relay them using sand and cement?
Cheers!
Martin
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OK, clearly I should use google *before* posting on here.
Do you reckon this stuff would do it? http://www.screwfix.com/p/tarmac-masonry-resin-r-kf2-380/62007
Or otherwise which of the stuff on this page? http://www.screwfix.com/c/screws-nails-fixings/resins/cat840122
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On 26/07/2011 02:37, Martin Pentreath wrote:

One of the newer high strength gran adhesives would do the job http://www.screwfix.com/p/unibond-megagrip-plus-water-resistant-grab-adhesive-300ml/30141
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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http://www.screwfix.com/p/unibond-megagrip-plus-water-resistant-grab-adhesive-300ml/30141
Resins in cartridges with long nozzles are generally used for getting an anchor fixing in masonry - hence their brands, Fisher, Rawl etc but polyester resin does have a lot of other uses, especially in repair and strengthening of old buildings. Not to my knowledge often used as an adhesive as you describe.
I would have thought pva would glue your bricks back on as long as the join is close and Dave's link may even be a pva based product. Presume there is no load or strength issue, just putting them back on. If you have an ongoing problem with damp and frost or deteriorating mortar then it won't go away of course but there is nothing wrong with making a repair which will buy you a few more years.
Tim W
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wrote:

Out of interest, why has no one suggested replacing the mortar, which I would have thought was the best long-term solution?
Jonathan
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Thanks for the replies. PVA?? I've got plenty sitting around, can't hurt to give it a go. There are indeed no structural requirements for the wall, it's purely a matter of sticking a few bricks back onto the top course of an essentially decorative garden wall.
Jonathan, I agree replacing the mortar would be the best solution, but ICBA (I think that's the acronym I'm looking for) and I don't have any faith in my ability to lay bricks in a straight line even in this limited situation!
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wrote:

PVA is water soluble, no use. Any of the resins would do it.
NT
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On 26/07/2011 12:01, Jonathan wrote:

I'd guess because the OP mentioned glueing?
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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I have just used a tube of this stuff:
http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Adhesives+Sealants/Grab+Adhesive/Stixall+MS+Polymer+Black/d180/sd3199/p60981
to stick the coping stones back onto the wall around our patio areas. Several weeks later they are still stuck fast despite being used as a thoroughfare by a troop of semi trained baboons (or that may be the kids - mI often have difficulties in telling them apart).
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