GLS lightbulb storage

Being tempted to stockpile a decent quantity of GLS light bulbs (the
ones about to be banned) the thought crosses my mind - do they
deteriorate in storage?
I'm talking about a prolonged time period up to 20 - 30 years (which
should see us out of chez nous into another world). I envisage
storing them in the attic and avoiding movement until needed.
Reply to
jim
Well I have several boxes of specialised light bulbs (odd voltages) that I use on machine tools in my workshop, and most are at least 20 years old, and some older. I cannot remember ever pulling one out that didn't work. These are mainly 24 & 48v bulbs in the same format as normal mains ones (ie standard bayonet). It may be that the stouter filament of a lower voltage aids longevity, but I would think that would only be the case if stored where vibration were a problem.
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
On Sat, 29 Sep 2007 12:51:35 -0700, jim wrote:
Seal 'em up in plastic, binbags or somesuch, they'll be fine. I'll be doing the same.
DG
Reply to
Derek Geldard
The guvmint will probably change the mains voltage just to bu&&er up that idea... Just think of all the VAT they'll make on new bulbs and appliances.
Reply to
Frank Erskine
They dont deteriorate as long as kept dry. There's nothing in the bulb envelope that will corrode the filament. Would be a good idea to fully encase the bulbs so no cleaning needed.
NT
Reply to
meow2222
All the light fittings in my house that can have CFLs already do. Are you going to pay to rewire & fit new luminaires because of Benn's stupid law?
Thought not.
Reply to
Huge
Exactly. The point is that people realise that they are being manipulated and forced into something inferior in terms of usability for no good reason.
Earlier discussions on this subject have been met with comments on both sides of the debate with some people feeling that the energy saving is worth it to them (be it for economic or feel-good reasons), while others feel that aesthetic factors outweigh that.
Until now, both views have been catered for because both types of product continue to be available.
In general terms, people have not been persuaded about the alleged benefits of fluorescent lightbulbs or they would have gone out and bought them and the market dynamics would have moved that way.
Given that situation, the government now attempts to force the issue by coercing market forces.
People aren't that stupid. They know when they are being had and subjected to hype.
Reply to
Andy Hall
Its surely a move that indicates people that dont understand the country theyre running. If CFL mfrs want to take over the bulb market, let them solve the issues of their CFLs - most of which are simple to resolve given a bit of awareness and profit incentive.
NT
Reply to
meow2222
No politician understands the country they're running, else there would be no law of unintended consequences.
Reply to
Huge
Bad example.
The power looms represented a quantum leap in performance over hand weaving.
I can't put it any better than Huge did in an earlier thread ...
"Electric lighting supplanted gas which supplanted candles/oil lamps because in each case the new technology was superior to the old. This is not the case with the banning of filament bulbs, which is being done for pointless political reasons by someone who neither knows nor cares about the issues and upon whom the inconvenience and expense of the change will not fall.
Now, here's your teaspoon. Get bailing".
If it seems trivial to you ask yourself why the government sees fit to take away our freedom to use whatever lighting we choose.
DG
Reply to
Derek Geldard
The reason of course is that they have no choice in the matter. They have been ordered to do so by Brussels. Philips in particular no longer make any profit out of incandescent bulbs and have spent a considerable amount of money "lobbying" EU bureaucrats (who really cost quite small amounts to buy) to get this change through as they believe it will open market opportunities for them.
Reply to
Peter Parry
... and here was me thinking that we had just signed up for a glorified trade agreement.
There is always a choice........
It couldn't also be that Philips have supplied bulbs to hand out, could it?
All very convenient.
Reply to
Andy Hall
I replaced all my 50w GU10's with Megaman 11w and they are by far and away superior.So they don't light up instantly whoopie do..
In no time at all the pressure will be on the manufacturers to solve the problems you all fear. That's how these things work.
I have no real love for forced democracy but like seatbelts sometimes you have to think for the masses and tell them what's good for them
Cheers
Richard
Reply to
r.bartlett
I tried one of these - same brand and same product - and thought that it was crap. Poor light quality and dim. That's before one considers the warm up time.
I wait with baited breath. They will also have to come up with something that mechanically fits properly as well.
Except this is good for nobody and for nothing apart from cheap capital for politicians. It doesn't resolve any particular problem or even significantly affect one.
Reply to
Andy Hall
I'm sitting under a couple of them as I type. They're whiter, cooler, generally a good thing. If they're a little slow to start - doesn't matter much.
In the downstairs toilet (the room that is!) I have an incandescent. It comes on effectively immediately, is on for a short time, then off again. If it breaks through too much power cycling, WTH the replacement is pence and won't put mercury into landfill.
CFLs do have their place, but so do incandescents.
Andy
Reply to
Andy Champ
I thought that seatbelts were blamed for shifting road accident fatalities from passengers to pedestrians?
Owain
Reply to
Owain

Site Timeline Threads

HomeOwnersHub website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.