Glass shelves

Need some toughened glass shelves made to order. Happy to collect in the London area. Any recommendations as to the best value supplier?
Using an online calculator from one place suggests a price of approx £400.
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On Fri, 29 Jan 2016 11:20:15 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

Can't help with London area but a while ago I got some 35in x 10in x 5mm toughened glass to use as shelves from a local glazier for about £50. Kowing what I know now I'd see if I could get them a little thicker if I was doing it again as they do sag slight under the weight of CDs. I'd suggest looking for a local back-street glass merchant. The firm I used had a website but had to be emailed for a quote.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I had some toughened, smokey shelves with radiused corners and milled edges from Prad Glass, happy with them, sizes were spot on.
<http://www.pradglass.com/order-shelves.html
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On Friday, 29 January 2016 11:20:25 UTC, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I didn't shop around as I needed somewhere local I could carry my shelves back from. They cut a mirror to order and drilled some 6 or 8mm holes in it for me.
http://www.allinlondon.co.uk/directory/1116/61924.php
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A little while ago I had 3 glass shelves made. About 1400x150x10. Polished all round. Had to be precise fit. Cost ?75. More recently I had a glass table top made to template. About 1015x915x8. This was a b*gger. Not a straight edge or a square corner. They made a fantastic job of it. Cost ?110. Supplier was Windsor Glass Co., not too very far from W. London. http://www.windsorglass.com/
HTH Nick.
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On 29/01/16 11:20, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

http://www.preedyglass.com/ J. Preedy & Sons Ltd (Stanley Works), 7b Coronation Road, Park Royal, London NW10 7PQ
Tel: +44 (0)20 8965 1323
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Thanks for the tips - looks like I'll have to phone round for the best price.
I'd like to have spacers between the two glass shelves. To stop things like books falling over. Something like a SS rod every 200mm or so works well enough. Easily done with wood - but how about glass? The idea used for the legs on a table etc would be fine - but can you get the same idea in say 12mm?
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On 30/01/16 17:48, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

http://www.preedyglass.com/fittings.html http://www.preedyglass.com/shelves.html
in particular http://www.preedyglass.com/pdfs/shelves/steelmax.pdf
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Nothing there even remotely like I'm after.
What I'm thinking of would involve drilling holes in the two shelves and having a vertical rod in say SS between them. If you've seen the way they make glass TV tables etc, the same idea as the legs only say about 12mm in diameter
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Alternative might be to use glass as partitions on the shelves. Perhaps 'floating' between them - ie with a gap top and bottom. But how to fix them to the wall behind? Plenty of shelf fixings on offer - but would they hold a vertical piece? And they seem to be made to look good from the top, so not so good side on.
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wrote:

You should be able to get them to drill the holes in the shelves like they do in the verticals you don’t like and put your own metal vertical rods in those holes to keep the books from falling over. All you really need is some form of screw on head to the rod and drop it into the hole thru the top shelf, guide the rod into the hole in the lower shelf and have the head stop it falling right thru the top shelf. That should look perfect.
So the vertical rods are just very long bolts with just little thread on the top to screw the head onto.
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It was easy to do an invisible fixing in the wood shelves for the vertical rods. But you can't screw into glass so it would need something which goes through the glass and fixed on the far side. Nuts and washers would look terrible.
TV etc tables have a neat round plate with a nut welded to it for the legs, which takes a threaded rod running through the legs. So that fixing only protrudes a couple of mm above the shelf - the nut part going in the hole. But that plate is something like 35mm diameter. And the threaded rod size too large. The idea would be fine if a smaller version was available, but I've had no success in finding it.
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On 03/02/2016 10:55, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Why not simply tap holes in the end(s) of the rods and use a bolt with a head that you like (with a felt washer, presumably)?
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That would look simply horrid on the top shelf. It is used to display things, so lots of the actual shelf shows.
Think of how the legs are done on a glass TV table etc. That would be fine scaled down.
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[snip]

Countersunk s/s setscrews ??
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Think you really need a large head to spread any load. As I said, the TV table type has something like a 35mm diameter 'washer' with a nut welded to the underside. The nut fits into the hole on the glass, and the 'washer' spreads any load. Even although the clamping force needed is minimal.
Wouldn't be impossible to make something - but getting it plated or whatever would be the problem.
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wrote:

There is no load on the head. All it does is stop the rod from falling thru the holes in the shelves. The side of the rod puts the load on the shelf hole.

Sure, but legs are different, they don’t have anything holding the bottom of the leg. In your situation the lower end of the rod goes into the lower shelf so that hole with the rod in it takes the side load from the books etc. The only thing the head does is stops the whole rod falling thru both holes, and so the only load on the head is the weight of the rod itself.

You don’t need to plate anything if you use stainless steel rod cut to length and deburred and glued into the holes with a glue that sets transparent like Tarzan's grip.
Might be hard to get holes drilled only part way thru the shelves, but that wouldn’t even need glue, you just put the rods in when putting the shelves into whatever holds them.
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They have a threaded rod which goes down the inside of the leg and claps the whole lot together. If it didn't, the table would fall apart when you lifted it.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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They don't have anything stopping the leg from moving sideways.
A rod between shelves has the hole in the bottom shelf which stops it moving sideways and the only thing there need to be at the top of the rod is something to stop the rod falling thru both holes due to gravity. Even glue will be plenty to stop that.
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The sort of table I'm talking about has more than one shelf. I dunno if a plain table would be OK with that type of leg

Have you ever looked at a hole in glass? Not the tidiest of things. The whole idea is to end up with something that looks decent.
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