flueless gas fires - powaflue?

Hi
Faced with a bill of 1500 squids to open up a hearth and rebuild a chimney stack, I'm wondering about a flueless gas fire.
Any comments on how good they are? We've got a rad in the front room, so there would be some extra warmth in the room which should prevent any condensation problems which I understand they may have.
And can anyone clarify what a powaflue is - I've seen an nice looking model which says that whilst it doesn't need a chimney, it does have a twin walled flue, so I'm wondering where the twin walled flue actually goes!
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A good few years ago when I bought a "Cannon Coalridge" balanced flue fire, there was another model with a "Power Flue". This was for fitting in places not against an outside wall.
The "power flue" was a rather chunky-looking ISTR white painted probably metal "skirting board-shaped" pipe that could be run around the room at floor level just like a rather ugly skirting board. Presumably it eventually reached a place where it could pop outside. I think there was a fan in the fire to make it work.
Things may have move on from that - it was a good few years ago.
Regards, Simon.
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OK, the following types of flue are available for gas appliances.
1. Flueless. The oxygen comes from the room. The fumes go back into it. Advantages: Very cheap, simple. Disadvantages: Possible death. Limited to low power. Requires massive ventilation. Condensation. Examples: Gas hob. Portable gas space heater. Cigarette lighter. Plumbing torch.
2. Open flue. The oxygen comes from the room. The fumes rise up a chimney flue using convection.
Advantages: Chimney may already exist. Removes combustion products, like CO and water. Cheap appliances. Disadvantages: Ventilation still required. Chimney problems may lead to room contamination. Flue expensive to construct or fix if broken. Examples: Traditional range cooker. Boiler from 1970s. Traditional gas fire.
3. Balanced flue. The oxygen comes from the flue terminal. The fumes are ejected from the flue terminal. Advantages: Room sealed. No specific requirement for ventilation. Cheap flue to install. Disadvantages: Flue length limited to short horizontal length through wall. Must be situated against outside wall. More expensive appliance. Examples: Balanced flue fire. Boiler from 1980s.
4. Fanned flue. The oxygen comes from the flue terminal. The fumes are ejected from the flue terminal. A fan is used to enhance this process. Advantages: As balanced flue. Additionally, flue length can be long, and involve bends and vertical and horizontal sections. More reliable flow than by convection/expansion alone. Good for high power applications. Disadvantages: More expensive appliance. Long vertical flues may be more expensive than an existing open flue. Fan may be noisy. Examples: Fanned flue fire. Modern boiler.
Christian.
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Mark have yor purchased a power flue as I am in the process of removin
one from my home. It is a Cannon Power Flue .I have a radiator which i enough for the size of room.
Mark Watson Wrote:

-- Ian Wood
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