Flooded Cars?..

On 17/02/2020 15:04, Brian Reay wrote:

Lithium ion batteries do not contain elemental lithium
It's a lithium salt, and they are sealed
--
"Nature does not give up the winter because people dislike the cold."

― Confucius
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Feb 2020 09:06:05 +0000, tony sayer wrote:

I'd have thought the biggest problem are absorbent materials such as underlay, noise insulation, carpets and seats which can never be 100% dried out. To put right you'd need to strip the interior down to a shell, and replace all the sodden items - not cheap. Going back to the 1990s, plain seats were £400 a pop brand new, so that's £1,600 plus vat plus labour immediately.
These days they're a lot more sophisticated. Also you have all the gubbins like seatbelt pretensioners that I imagine need changing.
No idea if catalytic converters enjoy being submerged either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And then there's the "little" problem of water entering the engine while it's running. If anyone is driving through water and it gets into the air inlet, the engine will quickly demonstrate how incompressible water is compared with air. My brother-in-law drove into a large puddle across a road at a fair speed (it was at night and the headlights didn't show the water as looking any different from the road surface, so he was driving at an appropriate speed for what looked like a straight road clear of hazards). Luckily he kept control of the car - it didn't skid out of control - but water got into the engine and knackered it. Being a diesel, with a greater compression ratio, the damage was worse. Fortunately his insurance paid for a new engine.
I'm not sure what exactly failed, but the engine would still turn over (but not fire), so evidently the connecting rods, crankshaft and cam-shaft/valvegear were all still intact. It may have knackered the injector pump: I'm not sure how the pressure of water in a cylinder with the piston at TDC compares with the pressure under which fuel is normally injected into the cylinder, and whether back-flow up the injector port to the pump would have been possible.
I can vouch for how difficult it is to get the inside of a car clean and dry. A former car flooded to a depth of several inches when the drain holes from the gutter at the base of the windscreen got blocked and it overflowed into the car following torrential rain overnight. That required me to remove the front seats, gear lever housing, carpet (top and underlay), and get the carpet professionally cleaned (I was able to wash the underlay in the washing machine). I discovered it just as I was about to set off on a business trip, so apart from mopping up the excess with every towel in the house, I couldn't do anything about it for a couple of days, by which time the water started to pong. I got it all sorted out, and I learned a lot about how the seats of a VW Golf are fastened to the floor and how to unscrew the gear lever housing. That was in the days before air bags, so there were no "bum-on-seat" detectors and also no heated seats, so no cabling to disconnect.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/02/2020 10:27, NY wrote:

This storm was very well forecast many days ago, and anyone paying attention to the jet stream and weather over in the USA would have guessed quite accurately that we were in for a 2013/14 type of weather event even further back.
The Met Office have been giving yellow, amber and latterly red alerts, so anyone ignoring those warnings and then damaging their car might find insurance cos being reluctant to pay out, just like they try to wiggle out of accident or illness claims to anyone on holiday abroad.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Indeed! But also there was that bit of vid on the BBC news showing a street in Wales I think were a Audi was bombing down the road with water up to and then over its bonnet makes me wonder just how it kept on f driving maybe the air intake is just that little bit higher?
Course no ones teaches anyone how to drive in a flood anymore do they just go as fat as you can and hope you'll make it thru!..
Unless its the Welney wash, been though here a few times quite hairy but this blokes got the right sort of wagon!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wc3BC-6Wp38

--
Tony Sayer


Man is least himself when he talks in his own person.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been told driving at more than a crawling pace can create a bow wave that keeps the engine air intake above the water. But just passing that on with zero experience of doing so. The old Rover has the air intake as low as possible to get the coldest air. So avoid puddles with it. ;-)
--
*Don't use no double negatives *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Feb 2020 14:46:10 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

a
kept

Well I got away with driving through a flood with the water lapping up onto the bonnet like that Audi but it took a lot of throttle and clutch slipping in 1st just to keep the thing moving and not letting the water get further up the bonnet. Water does not want to get out of the way like air...
I suspect that there is an "optimum" speed for going through a flood. Too fast and water is thrown up into the engine compartment soaking distributer or plugs, leads, coil packs or getting injested. Still has to get past the air filter but I guess a soggy air filter won't let enough air through. Too slow water can rise up into the engine compartment with similar effect. "Optimum" the water doesn't get a chance to rise up behind the grill, radiator, oil coolers, aircon condensor etc. So the engine stays dry.
The low down starter motor was never quite the same after my deep flood drive but nothing else suffered.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am very cautious about driving through flood water, both from the point of damage to the engine and the car being washed away by fast-flowing water.
I notice that this ford https://goo.gl/maps/XJtySvYQYFZ8UYX49 has a metal rail to prevent cars being washed off the ford. I've seen a 4x4 driving through this ford when it was in spate (we parked where the red car is in the photo, and looked at the flooding from the old bridge alongside the ford) and the driver was having to steer suddenly away from the barrier as he entered the water - which was about 2 feet above the road and really thundering along.
This ford https://goo.gl/maps/XxWwtzKK88CkbLKt7 and https://goo.gl/maps/y962wBCWRJyvHpLN8 is an intriguing one, because you drive along the *length* of a stream for about 100 yards. The first time we encountered it, I stopped and my wife walking along it in bare feet to check that it didn't get any deeper, before coming back and telling me it was OK.
I wouldn't like to try either ford when they were full. I remember driving down to the second one when there had been heavy rain, with no intention of going through, but just to see how high it could get. You have to reverse a long way to get to a turning-round spot, if the one by the gate in https://goo.gl/maps/XxWwtzKK88CkbLKt7 is several feet under water ;-(
Cycling through that ford is scary because even when the water is at its normal level and flow (as in the photos) the current tries to move the bike wheels off course as you turn the corner at the far end https://goo.gl/maps/y962wBCWRJyvHpLN8
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The ford at Ide, in Devon, is similarly long - said to be the second longest in Europe. Basically, it a fairly flat stream, bed that you just drive along. Can't remember how long it is, but I drove along it just for the hell of it and to be able to say I'd done it, back in my student days. You just hope you don't meet someone coming the other way! https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1080565 and
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSqngWxU5rw

--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Land Rovers are excellent because a) the door seals leak and let in water so they don't float and b) they have flat floors without sills so having exited the water just open the door and the water flows out. Best to be wearing wellies though.
--
bert

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 17/02/2020 17:26, NY wrote:

The lady running a sandwich shop in Pontypridd said the granite worktop in the shop needed 5 big blokes to carry it in.
The flood water just pushed it off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Feb 2020 20:56:08 +0000, Andrew wrote:

Water is denser than air so that lump of granite will weigh(*) over a 1/3 less in water than in air.
(*) Don't confuse weight with mass.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Liquorice wrote:

So three big scuba divers and one wimpy one?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18/02/2020 08:11, Andy Burns wrote:

:-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup. Enter slowly and go just fast enough to create the bow wave and you get a dip in the water behind it.

--
bert

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Feb 2020 17:05:57 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Liquorice"

BIL took us round an off road course in Abingdon a few years back in his 2L auto diesel Discovery. It was probably the first (and last) time it had ever been properly off road during his ownership.
At the end of the course was a long trench full of muddy water. The idea is you gunned it though this and saw how high you could spray the water.
Given this was his only / family car and daily driver we assumed he was going to go though it like Ms Marple. No, to our surprise he did give it some (for a 2L auto, 4 up) and I saw the water (just) come up the front windscreen (and no snorkel)!
The Fire Brigade were there hosing the cars off for a charity donation but nephew wanted to leave it as is for the drive home so we just wiped lights and number plates etc. Apparently it had to be left like that for a forthright for all nephews schoolmates to see. ;-)
However, about a month later the alternator failed and whilst it could have been a coincidence, we think it was a side effect of it's muddy dunking. ;-(
I have to say, given the lack of experience of the driver, it only being a 2L diesel, std fit tyres and an auto ... and without any diff locks, it handled the course very well! [1]
Cheers, T i m
[1] The towbar did ground out at the bottom of many of the hills, both on the way up and down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds like the sort of prat who gets off road driving a bad name.
--
bert

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip> >>[1] The towbar did ground out at the bottom of many of the hills, both

Aww, berk, are you jealous (as well as being too stupid to snip)?
1) It was a 'fun' closed course [1] for people of all skill and experience levels (inc none, so you could also have had a go if you wanted). ;-)
2) You were invited to 'run what you brung' ... and the only exception was the (presumably joke?) sign at the gate saying 'No Freelanders'.
3) Several vehicles had to get recovered because they got stuck somewhere or broke stuff (holding everyone up).
4) BIL did a good job for his first time, even impressing a couple of the marshals on the more complex bits (and given the limitations of his Disco).
5) He got a good cheer from the audience on the final water splash (and that was the point / goal).
6) On the second (of two) lap I managed to also get some video from the outside so he could enjoy seeing all the axle articulation and a feel for the angle of the assents / descents.
A good day out enjoyed by all. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
[1] But you knew that eh?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He's still a prat.
--
bert

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Standard practice for any off road driver. Original aim was to avoid the water hitting the fan and being sprayed all over the electrics (petrol engines in those days)

Problem with modern cars I think.
--
bert

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.