Engine Oil top ups (thing of the past maybe?)

Just chatting with a neighbour about engine oils (as you do) and remembering how, after an oil change, a sticker would be put on your engine to show what oil had been used. It used to be helpful back then - I would
think even more now with synthetics, semi-synthetics and mineral oils in use. Has anyone seen this recently?
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On 25/07/2020 12:11, JohnP wrote:

Never. I may have been lucky, but I've never had a car that really required a top-up between oil changes. (First car a 1972 Escort.)
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On 25/07/2020 13:26, Max Demian wrote:

Never bothered. Used to have an old 850 Mini that did 500 miles to the pint. Always carried a gallon of Duckhams 20/40W in the boot for on the fly topups!
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On 25/07/2020 14:18, Andy Bennet wrote:

My GF had one that did 50 miles to the quart.../
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On Sat, 25 Jul 2020 14:20:06 +0100, The Natural Philosopher

When I was a kid in the 1950's my father regularly bought half a pint of oil from the local garage when getting petrol. The garage forecourt had a little row of graduated oil-pouring cans standing by the pumps just for that purpose.
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Yes well, the smell and smoke from the older cars like the ones described could not under any circumstances to be said to be clean and green. Mind you surprised people have not banned 2 stroke engines as used in some garden equipment and el cheapo outboard motors as they check out a heap of blue smellyness. When I was young I liked the smell. weird. Brian
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My dads old Hillman Minx ended up using almost as much oil as petrol!
Brian
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On Sun, 26 Jul 2020 08:45:11 +0100, Brian Gaff \(Sofa\) wrote:

I had a Rover 105R with a crankshaft seal leaking, so I always parked it over a drain.
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Many makers these days specify the brand and type of oil to be used exclusively. Last time mine was serviced, they included a top up pack of the correct oil - a litre in a plastic bag with disposable gloves and tissues. ;-)
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I was told that with new cars main agents are obliged to put in whatever is in the manual or originally in the car. Wether you believe that is up for discussion, I a friend who had a particular fondness for Triumph Dolomites in the day and had a battle with his local Lookers BL garage who charged by the quart can for oil despite being told by a mechanic that the oil came o ut of big drum at the back of the garage.
Richard ,
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On 25/07/2020 14:49, Tricky Dicky wrote:

Worked on the pumps one summer in the mid 60's, often got asked to check the oil and top it up. We were required to refill empty oil cans from the bulk tank in the workshop, and try to make sure the customer didn't see that we didn't have to remove an aluminium tab from them. Castrolite and XL in those days.
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On 25/07/2020 15:20, newshound wrote:

Probably filtered sump oil. In the 60s they had bulk oil tanks on the forecourt and green jugs to transfer the oil to the engine.
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You'd need some filtration to make used oil look clean again. Although it can be done in a factory. Many small garages used old sump oil to heat the workshop in the winter.

Yes - a cabinet containing the oil. And a hand pump to get it to the jug.
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On 25/07/2020 18:53, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Exactly, no chance of that in a workshop of those days.
I still find it mildly astonishing that you can still see through the oil in my Jazz after a year.
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On Sun, 26 Jul 2020 09:31:11 +0100, newshound wrote:

Well the darkening is (mainly) soot from the combustion bypassing the rings, so I am guessing they've improved the tolerances ?
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On 26/07/2020 14:45, Jethro_uk wrote:

More likely I think improvements in combustion technology from a combination of injection, sensors, and ECUs, leading to much less soot.
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On 27/07/2020 12:21, newshound wrote:

The soot was as much as anything oil exposed to high temperature blowby gases.
The fact of the matter is that materials have come on hugely. A 1960s BMC A or B engine needed new big end shells at 30,000 and mains at 60,000 or a complete rebuild with rebore and new pistons at 90,000.
Most modern engines are 120-180k before there is *any* noticeable wear.
Metals are harder, oils are better and machining is to far tighter tolerances.
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My 2008 Peugeot has done 180,000 and it's still on its original clutch (*), exhaust system and shock absorbers. The timing belt was replaced at about 100,000 miles - not because it was worn but because this was the mileage stated by the manufacturer, and a broken belt would cause a valve/piston collision and hence major engine repair. The water pump was replaced at the same time simply because it is driven by the timing belt and the labour to replace the pump is the same as to replace the belt, so it makes sense to replace the pump just in case, rather than pay for a second lot of labour some time later on (the cost of a new pump is a lot less than the labour to replace it).
OK, so it's needed a new catalytic converter and diesel particulate filter, two things that a 1960s BMC A or B engine would not have had, but those are there for environmental rather than performance reasons: the car would run (illegally) perfectly well without them.
I'm not aware of any rust on the body or on any of the structural members. My first car, a 1980 Renault 5, suffered from bad rust over the rear wheels, but even that wasn't structural.
(*) Although the bite point has gradually risen, there's no hint of slippage so it doesn't need replacing yet. I've never had a car before that has lasted beyond about 80,000 on the same clutch.
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On 27/07/2020 12:29, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Anywhere near the coast in the western or southern parts of the country and they rusted away long before they needed major engine repairs.
In the 60' and 70's people actually made a point of buying 2nd hand cars of the more up-market models that had only been driven in places like east anglia

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On Sunday, July 26, 2020 at 9:31:13 AM UTC+1, newshound wrote:

Wrong vowel ??
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