Electricity for a shed

Hi. Just thinking on while I'm rewiring the kitchen I may as well lay down the cable to reach the shed in the back yard. I used 10m of 6mm cable to reach the cooker connection unit so I'll need only 20m maximum to reach a box in my shed.
1st question : It will be a separate breaker in the CU so white size cable to use 6, 4 or 2.5 ?
Thanks.
Arthur
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/08/2019 18:30, Arthur Ravenscroft wrote:

RCBO that is not connected to any existing RCD device in the consumer unit. If thats not possible get a new consumer unit.
That way when you get water in the shed electricsit won't trip the RCD and take out whatever else is connected to that RCD.
I leave it to others to cover the rules on sheds, part p, sheathed cable, catenaries, exported earths etc.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I rather like the idea of having a bespoke medium current isolated supply as well, which will enable earthing of the neutral so 'live' chassis devices and can be safely worked on. I used to do this many years ago, but fear doing this now could easily result in a problem if something earthed to mains earth from the house also gets earthed to my isolated neutral via the transformer.
Nobody seemed to care in the 1970s! Brian
--
----- --
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14/08/2019 09:53, David Wade wrote:

There is certainly merit in separating outdoor circuits from other house ones, however that may or may not mean that a RCBO at the head end is the best way forward. Having a RCD at the head end has a couple of obvious problems; firstly if it trips you have got a walk outside to reset it, and secondly you might be in the dark when doing so.
In other words, ensuring you have discrimination so that faults on a socket circuit does not cause loss of lighting might be important.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/08/2019 18:30, Arthur Ravenscroft wrote:

That all rather depends on what load you need it to support... having said that, cable is relatively cheap, and access, opportunity, and time and effort might be harder to come by later, so larger than you need right now may save lots of hassle later.
Have a read though:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Taking_electricity_outside
There is a section on submain design and cable choice.
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I suddenly remembered a neighbour who kind of might have earned the Darwin award, as his wife seemed liable to kill him when the whole house was cut off. This was an old house with just circuit breakers for sockets and lights. What he had done many years earlier is taken a pvc three core cable along a fence, up a pole and over a concrete area to a post on his shed, then down to the shed. His major mistake was to situate a garden incinerator just below the cable and light it full of garden waste and go indoors to what the tv. I'm sure you can guess that a half an hour later, all his sockets went off with a bang as the pvc melted. Ahem. Brian
--
----- --
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.