economical wood filler for stripped pine

I have just stripped some floorboards, doors and furniture and quite a few old woodworm holes and dents need to be filled.
What is the most economical way to buy a 'natural pine' coloured wood filler, and where can I get it from.
The 250mg pot of Cuprinol High Performance Wood Filler (natural) is excellent, but much too expensive at around 6.00 a tin for all this work.
Thanks in advance,
Jeith
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Keith (Dorset) wrote:

PVA and scrap pine wood...Use a router or power tool that creates a fine dust when cut then mix PVA with the dust to make your own filler. -- Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

How do you stop it shrinking on drying?
I have never been able to get a filler that does not shrink when it drys with any variation of the "glue and sawdust" technique.
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

Maybe it's a combination of soaking in and drying that's shrinking it ?
How about fibreglass resin and hardener as a binder ?
Not too much hardener, lest it self combusts ;)
Car body filler is also low shrinkage, but would look awful as a wood filler !
Cheers
Paul.
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

I really, really would not do this - the PVA is hard to finish well, and won't take stain, and can get on surrounding timber causing similar problems. The Cuprinol stuff is OK ( as meow says use a shade darker than the timber) - can you "cut" it with wood dust, or use shellac and sawdust?
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snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com says...

I wouldn't try to fill dents - they're going to look worse filled than just left. You could try steaming them to reduce their depth. I wouldn't bother trying to invisibly repair flight holes either - using something a bit darker than the wood will stand out less than something a bit lighter. If you don't want old wood to look like old wood you could always paint it.
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Keith (Dorset) wrote:

Either paint the door, or throw the pine away and get something decent.
Pine is complete crap, its not even as good as MDF. Its usally lousy with knots, lousy with resin, moves further from its initial position than a labour politician seeking re-election and about as strong as balsa wood.
With about 200 quids worth of labour, and materials, its possible to make a pine door look decent by painting it.
I can buy a solid oak door that looks good for 160 quid with just a lick of varnish or oil..
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Did the OP ask for your opinion on the quality of his pine? Well, shut the fu then. IMO Brummer Stopper is the best filler for old pine. Just remember to match the colour with the finished colour of the boards, not the sanded colour. Liberon wax sticks are okay but lots of small holes would take forever.
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Stuart Noble wrote:

Did I ask you to present an opinion on my opinion? Did the OP ask my persmission to pollute the NG with silly requests about how to make a cheap silk purse out of an expensive sows ear?
Take your own medicine.
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Amen to that. Bought some cheap Homebase doors to replace my hardboard and paper ones. Unfortunately the loo door has bowed so much that's it's difficult to get any privacy in there :-)
Cheers
Paul.
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'Pine' covers all sorts of wood - from the nasty stuff you get today to some of the strongest and long lasting timber.
--
*What hair colour do they put on the driver's license of a bald man? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Agreed..but no pine is as good as even Oak really..which ain't the most stable of timbers..
Iroko is way better than pine..and looks quite decent...
Lets think about costs foir a second.
I have some solid oak doors - country ledge and brace style. They are about 6 foot by 3 ft by an inch..say in total 1.5 cu ft of oak, which wholseales at 20 quid a cubic ft. So 30 of material - say 40 to allow for wastage.
Now my piit is that the average solid wood door - even a pine one - is over 80 quid...maybe 100 - these were I think 130 quid...for an extra 30 quid you can get a really decent door that doesn't NEED all this buggering about.
How many hours of buggering about is it worth to save 30 quid...?
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Keith (Dorset) wrote:

Pine is the one wood where I would recommend against doing this. Filled pine nearly always looks bad, leave the holes and it looks like old wood, which is far from perfect but a lot better than filled.
Why? Pine changes colour so much that a consistent match with filler is, if not technically impossible, impractical. You always get filler stain marks where it was wiped flat, looked perfect at the time, but as tints change it shows up looking like sht.
Just dont do it. I've seen both approaches, and would live with the holes any day.
Dents can be steamed to raise them, but with pine, old wood is old wood, and always will be.
NT
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