Drains and roots

Yesterday, I replaced a drain inspection cover. As I did, I noteced a small root clump just where one of the pipes exited the inspection hole towards the house.
I removed the roots, cutting at the point where one small root entered the pipe, however:
Presumably there is a chance of other parts of the drains being penetrated by roots. Is there anything easy that can be done to prevent this? For example anything which can be (legally) put down the drain periodically to kill the roots?
Otherwise is it simply a case of waiting for serious problems?
Thanks
--
Tony Collins





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Pro drain cleaning outfits have root cutting nozzles on their machines. These things operate at 8,000 psi + and will easily cut roots away. If it ever becomes a problem it can be sorted, but they charge like the Light Brigade.
Dave
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Tony Collins wrote:

Possivly.
At least its accessible.
Real answer is to make good any cracks that allow water to seep out and roots to seep in.

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Is it possible to remove the source of the problem, ie the plant/shrub/tree etc. ? A quick search will return particular types of tree which actively seek out sources of water, willow being one which springs to mind. Their roots are extremely invasive and bear in mind that if large root systems are affecting the sub-structures of your property, then killing them off will eventually lead to a void which can cause other structural problems.
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Tony Collins <reply_to_group> wrote:

You might want to locate the tree and have it out.
There's a story told in this village (before our time) of a weeping willow in the front garden of a cottage, just down the lane. The roots shot under the road, entered into the main sewer, and found Paradise. By the time the blockage was investigated the roots occupied and partially blocked a 10ft length of sewer. The sewer had to be dug up and replaced, supposedly at the house owner's expense.
--
Tony Williams.

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Thanks for the help all.
Unfortunately there are a number of trees around, and most have TPS's on them - so removal isn't much of an option - even if I could identify which was the culprit.
Guess I'll just have to cross my fingers.
--
Tony Collins



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Tony Collins wrote:

If you dig down to expse the pipe - not that hard - and cut roots awaay and simply wrap it on plastic and encase in concrete, it should stop the water leaking out and the roots tracking in.
But once you have the pipe exposed, sometimes its simpler to replace, shingle it up and re-soil it anyway.
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"Tony Collins" <reply_to_group> wrote in message

when we bought this house we had to have a drain survey done with a cctv camera (about 100) they found a few roots growing through cracks in the drain's. in the end the vendor had to have about 25ft of drain relined with like a thin epoxy liner, cost about 500, supposed to have a twenty year guarantee.
Paul.
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