DIY near misses

As a follow up to Geoff's post regarding his uncle I hope he doesn't mind me starting a thread encouraging contributors to recount near misses they have experienced that could have had serious consequences, a sort of tribute and reminder.
Here's mine:
As a teenage lad I was helping my dad re-roof a stone walled barn when he put his weight on a tile batten and promptly went straight through it, falling through the sarking felt and rafters to the floor below.
The family rushed to his rescue to find him sitting on the floor of the barn unharmed apart from a concussion and a gash on his forehead. On looking up we noticed that he had bounced off a dividing wall used to store a row of scythes hung on rusty iron spikes driven into the wall.
I have no idea how he avoided the bagatelle on the way down.
Over to you . . .
The story of my own (multiple) adolescent electrocutions can wait until later.
--
fred
FIVE TV's superbright logo - not the DOG's, it's bollocks
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I was working late, (only two of us in the factory) testing a boiler control panel. The system was waiting to detect a flame (normally from an oil injector). We used to hold the flame detector (metal casing) near to a candle, which I did. I was bending down, started to overbalance and grabbed the first thing that came to hand, a 440v test switch, I couldn't loose it. Things started to go black and I must have fallen backwards dragging the switch out of my hand. I came round with the other guy prodding me with his coat covering his hands ;)
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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 01:35:48 +0100 Fred wrote :

The worst thing that happened to me - which could have been very nasty - was working up a short ladder, one of those folding ones unfolded so about 2.5m. A friend and I were building an extension, corner house, flank wall at the back of the pavement, and the ladder was resting against some ply sheathing on timber frame. I must have overreached: the ladder and I went sideways and I hit the pavement hard. After a moment or two my first thought was whether I could move my feet or not, fortunately yes.
My friend called the ambulance and after a quick check they said they'd better take me to hospital to be checked over, was I OK to walk to the ambulance, by then yes. When we got to the hospital they insisted on stretchering me in as the boss might be watching.
The funny side: what probably saved me from serious injury was that it was a bitterly cold February day and I had multiple layers of clothing on. When the nurse asked me to remove my outer clothes it was like pass-the-parcel: jacket jumper, body warmer, another jumper shirt, tee shirt, ....
Since then I have always treated ladders with a bit more respect - I only fell a short distance, but if it had been summer and I'd just been wearing a tee-shirt or my head had hit the ground first I might be typing this from a wheelchair ... or not at all.
--
Tony Bryer, Greentram: 'Software to build on' Melbourne, Australia
www.superbeam.co.uk www.eurobeam.co.uk www.greentram.com
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My ladder scare was not from a fall but nearly been hit by a falling ladder. The guy fitting the alarm on a three storey house asked me to foot the 3 stage ladders whilst he was up there. After he had come down from the ladders we started to lower them. However he had not locked the top section and it came straight down towards my face. I let go of the ladder and rolled . The section missed my head by about 12 inches.
--
Adam



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fred wrote:

Never had one myself ;-) David
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Lobster wrote:

I lied, as reminded by the angle grinder story posted by someone else.
Years ago, I was working with mine (can't remember what) when it suddenly stopped working. Rats. Fiddled about with it a bit, put it down on the ground and scratched my head. Spotted the plug lokked like it might not be fully home in its socket and gave it a push.
Yes, you've guessed it: angle grinder behind me burst into life as I'd left the trigger lock on, and took off across the floor like a banshee, the blade missing my leg by a few centimetres. Duh.
David
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Our first house, and the sofa had been delivered. I was hacking the thick plastic off with a stanley knife. At the bottom it was really thick as folded over several times.
For some insane reason that escapes me now I ended up lying on the floor pulling the knife towards me with some gusto. As you can imagine to plastic gave and I ended up with a knife about 5mm from my eyeball.
I remember lying there in a sweat wondering how I could have been so bloody stupid.
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I wore building gloves to protect my hands from the stone I was hefting about, and cutting with a 9 inch angle grinder. When the grinder skipped out of the stone, the disc caught the glove and dragged my hand in. I found myself kneeling on the ground, firmly attached to the grinder, with the disc in the back of my hand, and the contents of my hand congealing over the garden. This counts as a near miss because another inch would have cut half the hand off, rather than merely severing tendons.
I'm all right now ;-)
Cheers Richard
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A mate rewired a new 2 pin rubber connector to his extension and to his hedge clippers. You know the connectors where u stand on the cable lift the trimmer and disconnect. Needless to say he fixed the plug and socket on the wrong way round. Stepped on the cable lifted the trimmer and disconnected. Picked up the extension the shock clamped his hand around and the electricity did not cut off. Poss 5 seconds later he had the wherewithall to pull the plug free. It fried a tendon in his shoulder and alyways gives me the shivers thinking about it. Peter
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That reminded me of an X ray image I've seen, so I went looking for it again, and found it...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/roentgenator/1435208683 /
Actually, this isn't where I saw it originally, because there was no explanation of how it happened and I was wondering, whereas there is here.
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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On Aug 11, 2:21pm, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Reminds me of the famous x-ray of someone's head with several nails in it.
NT
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And this one
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3078188.stm
http://www.anomalies-unlimited.com/Odd%20Pics%202/Drillbit.html
--
Adam



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"holding an explosive device". Sheesh. Hi, everyone, say hello to Uncle Charles.
At least when I was into explosives (as encouraged by my A level Chemistry master, some 40 years ago), I had the 'common' to use electrical detonation and *long* pieces of wire. The bangs got bigger and bigger, the police started arriving earlier and earlier, so we gave it up. My mate ended up in hospital after playing with anhydrous silver nitrate, though. (Drip water onto it and the heat of hydration is enough to make it detonate.)
--
Today is Prickle-Prickle, the 5th day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3176
Celebrate Zaraday
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geraldthehamster wrote:

Ah. Mine was a biy like this. Router, switched it off, and moved to put it down, thing wound my jeans round the bit within an inch of...well..before it stopped.
Ruined the jeans. NEVER put a power tool down till its STOPPED.

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Learnt very early when I put down a drill as it spun down onto a dust sheet - which it promptly snatched up.
Safety guards or not - I wait until handheld power tools have stopped moving before putting them down.
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. I remember The Natural Philosopher

Back in the days of steel-framed fish tanks I was metal brushing one with a rotary steel wire brush in an old B&D. It slipped under pressure and grabbed onto my jeans, ripping the right leg apart as it slowed. Luckily there was no skin contact.

Good idea.
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wrote:

After my mishap she told me I should never pick one UP till it's stopped ... ;-)
Cheers Richard
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On 11/08/2010 01:35, fred wrote:

Helping a mate add a waterproofing layer of torch on felt to his multiple flat roofs, I was working around the edge of one doing a neat "drip" that would be visible from down below. I had two blow torches with me, a small ish one on a 4.5 kg propane tank, and a big f'off long reach jobbie on a 47kg tank. At this point I was using the big torch for a bit, while working from a platform ladder (the sort of thing with a 5' wide platform and couple of ladder type ends). The height of which was set so that my head was about level with the (single storey) roof level. The torches have two controls - one that sets the current gas rate, and a flare lever that lets you whack it up to full power instantly. Hence I usually set the burn rate to just enough to keep it alight in the wind, and then flare it when actually torching. As I worked my way along, I found I needed to put the big torch down for a moment while I sorted the next strip of felt, and so put it on the roof in front of me. There is a bend in the end of the pipe that means you can do this without the end touching what you put it down on, so its quite safe with the flame burning on low level a few inches above the surface its sat on. That is until you pop your head over the roof line and notice that you have put it down such that for the last 30 secs or so, it has been flaming the rubber pipe connecting the other torch to its regulator on the propane tank you left sitting on the roof some hours earlier! The prospect of a flaming pipe whipping about with 4 bar of propane pressure behind it did not really merit thinking about!
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 14:56:33 +0100, John Rumm wrote:

With the whipping about and the amount of gas that 4 bar could release would it have stayed alight?
--
Cheers
Dave.




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On 11/08/2010 22:49, Dave Liquorice wrote:

I have no idea, just glad I did not find out! (the hose was a bit charred - but only the outside layer, it may well have taken quite a while to burn right thorough)
--
Cheers,

John.

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