DeWalt is this offer any good?

B&Q have this offer on.
159 for a DeWalt twin pack.Combi Drill and driver set. Both are 12V. It says the saving is 40, it was 199.
if you do to the main page and click on the View our latest deals bit, its on page 15 of that, http://www.diy.com/diy/jsp/content/ecat/wk22flyer/popup.jsp
What are DeWalt like. Is this offer any good.
thanks for the help
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Similar offer:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 0372&tsu887&id)438
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Don't bother. Screwfix are selling the 12v Makita drill/driver and Impact driver for 139. Then buy a 50 Ryobi SDS mains drill. You are then set. The Ryobi ONE+ range may be a better buy as the one battery fits all tools.
DeWalt are yellow B&Ds.
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Mak have an outstanding reputation on cordless drills.

Or any other 2Kg SDS. My bosch has put up with 10 years and many occasions of being pushed to it's limits.

Much the same when you buy tools of the same voltage from any manufacturer. Single manufacturer chargers tend to be universal.
Can anyone say, that has direct experience from different manufacturers, how the ryobi batteries measure up against the others for longevity?

Er - no. Although B&D & DW is one company, DeWalt quality (IME of mitre saws) is the equal of the pro Bosch stuff.
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Mak have an outstanding reputation on cordless drills.

Or any other 2Kg SDS. My bosch has put up with 10 years and many occasions of being pushed to it's limits.

Much the same when you buy tools of the same voltage from any manufacturer. Single manufacturer chargers tend to be universal. <<<<
Not quite. The ONE+ range is 18v and a comprehensive range of "bare" tools.

Can anyone say, that has direct experience from different manufacturers, how the ryobi batteries measure up against the others for longevity? <<<
They are 18v and I believe Panasonic cells. Top quality.
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Doctor Drivel wrote:

The same is available from all the big manufacturers who sell tools as kits and also "body only". "one+" is only an "innovation" in the mid priced domestic market (Although B&D flirted with the scheme for a few years).
--
Cheers,

John.

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The ONE+ range is fully identifiable badged range. No others do it. Others say we have all these using the same batteries and you can buy them separately..but whisper it.
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Of course they do. All of the major manufacturers have battery commonality across most of their product ranges.

Yes, because in the professional market it's an expected thing, has been for many years and not an interesting marketing point. It would be like a car manufacturer saying that their cars are fitted with petrol tanks.
The only thing here that makes it interesting for Ryobi is that they are selling into the mid range market which has never had this before.
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Please read again.

thank you.
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I have. They are making an issue that would be a non issue in the professional market.

You're welcome.
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DeWalt are a good quality manufacturer.
However, you have to consider the application. A 12v drill will not be powerful enough for all applications. If you want complete drilling coverage, you would need something like a mains hammer or SDS drill. These cordless ones will do up to about 5mm screws and the holes for them.
The more typical industry standard is 14.4v and not much heavier than 12v.
I would also look at the number of batteries - i.e. is it really 2 as implied? The point of having two tools would be if you are alternately drilling and screwing. Having a third battery pack helps if you are going to do this.
Otherwise, if you really only need to do one operation at a time, you would be better spending similar money on a single 14.4v tool with two batteries.
For those, I would look also at Makita because I think their cordless drill products are a bit better than DeWalt and Bosch.
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<snip>

<FX> Aaaaaarrrhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!! </FX>
Google is your friend.....
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So a 12v makita will be better than a 12 DW?
Also (a bit dense here) what is an impact driver for exactly.??
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I would say so - from my experience with trying both, the Makita speed control is a bit finer. You can drill and drive screws at a slower speed. This is useful when doing work where you want the screws all to be at the same depth and they are small.
However, I would not buy a Makita 12v, rather the 14.4v.
I do have a Festool C12 which is a 12v tool, but this is a very different animal - different motor technology and very fine control. Even so, I wouldn't suggest this vs. 14.4v model either.

Different thing again. This is for driving screws and coach screws etc. generally in constructional work. A deck is a good example. The intent is that screws can be driven without drilling first and very rapdily. It's not a precision tool by any stretch of the imagination. Useful, but you still need drills and other screwdrivers. I haven't bought one because I can cover my needs in other ways. However, an impact driver may be interesting if you have a lot of outdoor work or framing to do.
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Oooh - spot the rich kid!
Seriously - I'd be interested in your experience of it. The cordless drill is prob the tool I use the most, so would consider the extra .
I tried one of their circular saws and must say - different, but a very finely engineered beast.
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It's quite special, frankly still unique AFAIK
Previously the Makita 14.4v was my work horse and still is for quite a few applications. I also have a Makita 18v one for heavier work such as wall drilling up the point of using an SDS.
The C12's motor is a brushless phased type using a phase controller for speed. This means that good torque is available down to very low speeds indeed - similar technology to robotic control systems. There is a 1-2 gear change as in other drills but the clutch arrangement is electromechanical. At the point that the clutch on most drills starts slipping and clicking, the C12 detects this and stops the motor - within half a revolution.
Ergonomics are precise. You can balance the drill comfortable on your index finger at the top rear of the handle - i.e. where the fingers normally go to operate the trigger and hold the tool.
I quite like the Centrotec fittings. This is a Festool proprietary fitting similar to the 6mm hex but without the slop and play. Put in a drill or a screwdriver bit and it's locked precisely. If there is a need to alternate, there are several Centrotec holders in the kit and you can leave the bits in them, pulling off the holder to swap. You can still use the 6mm hex bits in a holder though.
The Centrotec holders and the other chucks use FastFix, which is Festool's fitting for quick release.
Apart from the ordinary chuck, there are two others. An angled chuck can be fitted to the front of the drill in place of the normal one and turned to any orientation. It also has a Fastfix fitting so will take any of the other chucks. There is an offset chuck which has the output fitting right at the very edge. This will take a Centrotec bit directly (or 6mm) and allows drilling and screwing in awkward places like cabinet inside corners.
To give you an indication of fineness of control, for a recent project I needed to fit a lot of hinges and drawer runners and other fittings to MDF drawers, many into the edges. The screws were small 3mm x 12mm ones. If you have ever tried this you will have discovered that's it's easy to strip out the hole. I was able to put all of the screws in consistently using the C12 on its lowest but one clutch setting.
Apart from these, there is a choice of battery technology and the charger of course allows the battery packs just to left without damage.
If I were in the market for a 14.4v drill and had something for the larger jobs, I'd certainly buy this product. It has been consistently well reviewed and has won several innovation awards, quite rightly.
The other thing that I would do if buying now as opposed to a year and a half ago when I did would be to buy it in the U.S. The current UK price is around 300 inc. VAT. The U.S. price is around $340. That would be interesting to do if making a visit to the U.S., probably not worth it with shipping.
There's a video on this page
http://www.mcfeelys.com/festool/festool_subcat.asp?subcat ".32.1.9

Indeed. If I didn't have a saw bench with slider, and needed to cut large sheet material, I would look at their guide rail system with the TS55 saw.
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It was the TS55 I tried at a trade show, so only a superficial impression. Thanks for the tip on the US market, I may well investigate that sometime.
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It's interesting if you are going to buy a lot of stuff because the shipping rates move more into weight rather than being heavily loaded by transaction costs or dimensions. Usually that works out less expensive.
Taking the case in point, you would have $350 plus probably $50 in shipping (equals 200). Add duty (2%) and import VAT and you are at about 240 vs 300. Can be interesting.
A better solution, if you are thinking to buy several items, is to take a cheap flight to the east coast for a weekend (treating it as a break). Then you will have no shipping cost (in effect) and 145 of duty free allowance. However, if you are putting such items in boxes or luggage, there is now a 20kg weight limit per item before you get gouged for excess baggage charges at special rates. That would blow out any saving.
I did also look at prices from German tool suppliers, but there does not appear to be a worthwhile saving there.
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The guide rail is a brilliant tool. But you can make one for any saw. Just get a thin sheet the width of the saw's foot to the blade plus the width of a box of ally tube to sit on it and use as a runner.
The really neat thing with the Festool design is the thin foam rubber srtip under the guide that holds it in place without the need for clamps or screws. Again a bit of foam and some evostick would do that job.
Just slap the guide down on the marks for the piece you want cut and place the saw on the fence and away you go. Cutting large sheets in half is no problem. Just put a scrap of waste under the board to raise it above the others in a stack and you are away.
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Andy Hall wrote:

For this sort of thing I find a smaller Yankee screwdriver is perfect. Cost? 99p :))
cheers, Pete.
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