Dehumidifier for laundry drying.

We dry the washing on ceiling mounted washing hanger in the utility room, size about 2.5 x 3.5 m. Room can be left with the door closed most of the time.
We'd like to get a dehumidifier to speed up the drying, presumably a small 10 - 12 L one is all we need, no need for anything bigger?
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Thanks
Chris French
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On 10/11/15 14:31, Chris French wrote:

The EcoAir DD122 Simple is a basic dessicant unit - pretty good.
2 settings - fast at about 500W and a half power setting.
I upgraded to a Meaco refrigerant based unit that does the job in less time at less than half the power (so a lot less energy). I use the EcoAir for periodic drying out of my tool shed - seems to keep the damp at bay.
Either will work and the Meaco is better, if you don;t mind the extra cost.
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Thanks. I think I would prefer a compressor one.
I am considering the Meaco 10L:
<http://www.airconcentre.co.uk/products/4289119877
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On 10/11/15 15:13, Chris French wrote:

I've got the 20l and it is a bit of a beast - the 10 should be a tad more subtle. However, it's not very noisy (I can sleep with it behind 1 door on the low setting).
Mostly fan noise - the compressor element is audible but about as much as a fridge I'd say. Nicely built machine too.
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On Tuesday, 10 November 2015 15:20:32 UTC, Chris French wrote:



st.

Beware that some machines now run the fan all the time, wasting your hard e arned. They claim some sort of air purifying function as a euphemism for 'w e left out the relay so it'll cost you £200 in wasted leccy.'
Tank capacity just translates to emptying frequency. Plumbing it in elimina tes that.
NT
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On 10 Nov 2015, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com grunted:

Yes, but not all machines let you do that (doesn't look like above model does), and it's a feature worth looking for if it may be of use.
We have two machines; one of them has a socket at the back where you can shove a drain hose in - if I'm using this machine in anger I tend to stand it on a stool with the hose leading to a 2-gallon bucket next to it on the floor. Reduces the emptying frequency a lot, and is less fiddly.
If I was the OP I'd definitely look for this facility - stand the dehumidifier on the utility room worktop with the hose just draining into the sink.
--
David

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Living the dream
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Yup, it was on my list of features :-)
The above model does have it, and that basically is my plan
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2015 09:30:42 +0000, Chris French

But not into a bucket as they don't have the full / cutoff feature. ;-)
We often use a dehumidifier as you intend for drying extra-thick clothes and stuff not suitable for the tumble dryer (like daughters chainsaw trousers) by putting them and the dehumidifier in the bathroom.
I was considering putting it in the bathroom cupboard (as that has a louvred door in any case) and plumbing the outlet though the wall and into the garden but I wasn't sure how well that would cope with freezing (as it would be used more in the winter than the summer).
The ideal solution would be to plumb it into the drain properly but whilst the cupboard backs onto the toilet, it isn't so easy.
Cheers, T i m
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On 2015-11-11, T i m wrote:

With a socket in the bathroom cupboard? (Not that I personally think there's anything wrong with that, but....)
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wrote:

I hear you and probably not. It would probably be hard wired into a double isolated / fused outlet (if that's any more acceptable to the regs)?
Cheers, T i m
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On 2015-11-12, T i m wrote:

IMO the bathroom regs are excessively strict; I think you should be able to have an RCD-protected socket in a bathroom cupboard for things like this. Anyway, you may also have to shell out £200 for an IPX4 dehumidifier (e.g., the EcoAir DCW10).
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wrote:

Quite.

Hmmm (and thanks for that) but are you saying that is the only type of dehumidifier you could put in a bathroom?
FWIW, mine is all plastic, would be on a raised / fixed self in said cupboard and wouldn't be touched (if plumbed in) in any case (not that that may make a difference etc).
Cheers, T i m
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On 2015-11-12, T i m wrote:

I guess it would depend on the zones (I'm sure someone else here knows). Does the presence of a cupboard door between a point & the bath/shower affect the zoning, or do you have to measure as if it weren't there?
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I keep some of the water - it's ideal for using in a steam iron.
Also use it for watering some plants which can't have tap water (when I can't be bothered to go outside to get some rain water from the water butt).
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Andrew Gabriel
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On 2015-11-11, T i m wrote:

I used to have an all-in-one dehumidifier with pump in the cellar, with the hose running out through an air brick, about 1 m horizontally outside, & into a rain drain, but I had problems with it freezing in the winter. (The dehumidifier died eventually anyway.)
My new system consists of a dehumidifier (on a shelf) that drains into a separate condensate pump. This time, I put a piece of 22 mm overflow pipe through the wall from a (different) drain, fixed so it is gently sloped up inside & goes about 2 m into a crawl space. The hose from the pump goes into that pipe with something like 500 mm of overlap, so I don't think the water that "sticks" in the narrow hose can freeze, & the pipe will drain completely (so not freeze). This winter will be the first test.
(That reminds me, I need to drain & shut off the outside tap.)
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Well, I bought the above Meaco 10L.
It's doing the job as hoped, clothes dry a lot quicker.
I have it sitting on the draining board at the moment, with the drainage pipe running into the sink. If I want to collect some water I stick a jug under it. Seems well built, and not that noisy (not really an issue for us anyway, as shut away in the utility room) most of the noise comes from the fan, sounds rather like a fan heater I guess.
Keep meaning to stick a fan in the room as well to circulate the air better, see if that speeds things up at all.
And good service from Aircon Centre, they had the cheapest price, that included next day delivery. Which in my case was slightly surprisingly Saturday.
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Chris French


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On 10/11/2015 14:31, Chris French wrote:

Why not just get an Xpelair and a inlet ventilator? That's what I did. Much cheaper to buy and run.
Bill
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On Thu, 12 Nov 2015 21:40:58 +0000, Bill Wright

Doesn't that suck all your warmth outside?
I was considering one of those heat exchangers for the bathroom but never got any further than thinking about it. I think they can only be a maximum 50% efficient (heat recovery) and hence why I (and others) use dehumidifiers for such things. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 12/11/2015 22:02, T i m wrote:

Yes but who cares? My utility room is best kept cool and dry. Heat in there would be of no benefit.
Bill
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