Damp!

Hi all,
Can anyone explain what kind of damp this is and what might be causing it? There is nothing amiss or damaged on the outside of the building that could account for it so I'm at a complete loss as to what the underlying problem could be. Here's a pic:
http://oi66.tinypic.com/1zzgvn4.jpg
Thanks.
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On 17/07/2019 13:35, Dan Green wrote:

Somehow managing to get around the door frame ?
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On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 14:37:57 +0100, ss wrote:

I can't see any defects with the sealant around the outside, though.
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Worth hosing it on the outside to see if it leaks.
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On 17/07/2019 13:35, Dan Green wrote:

Getting in at the top of the frame (side or top surface) and dripping down the voids in the frame. Building up at the bottom. Look for pinholes in the sealant around the top.
Bill
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On Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:35:26 UTC+1, Dan Green wrote:

It could be water getting through bad pointing or cement rendering as well as the above. It could be many feet above the door and dripping on to the cavity tray abo ve the door & running off the end of it.
https://www.google.com/search?q=image+cavity+tray&rlz 1AVNG_enGB731GB 753&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=-e7lP-T_uMFB7M%253A%252CJCDF8RARs oJCQM%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kT8ne1AuxA391n_bTDYUzWJSNdVRw&sa=X&ved=2 ahUKEwj90daWlrzjAhWFh1wKHbXCCXIQ9QEwAXoECAQQBg#imgrc=-e7lP-T_uMFB7M:
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On 17/07/2019 13:35, Dan Green wrote:

Could be condensation, but also the ground level outside could be close to the DPC. You may also get splashback from the hard surface.
(I had a similar problem here, which in the end I tracked down to a down pipe from the gutter. It went straight into the ground, but did actuall appear to be connected to the waste water pipe - stick a hose in the gutter and it ended up arriving at the septic tank.
In the end I had a dig to investigate, and found the builders had effected a transition from square downpipe, to 110mm soil pipe by stopping the downpipe a bit above the soil pipe and "sealing" the gap with a carrier bag! So a proportion of the water soaked straight into the ground right next to the wall. So I figged a proper gully with trap, and let the pipe empty into that. Replaced the rotten floor timbers, and made sure they were not pressed right up against the wall this time. Been fine since.
--
Cheers,

John.
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Daughter had this in a rented place before she bought their own place. The landlord got a damp survey and I was there when the surveyor did it as daughter was at work.
He explained it was condensation. I was dubious and asked how he could tell. The explanation was that, if the moisture came through the brickwork, the minerals inhibited the black mould. The landlord installed one of those heat exchange extractors- they warm the incoming air with the outgoing (warm) air. It solved the problem.
You may not need to go as far as the extractor, just look at ventilation and possibly a dehumidifier.
--
Corbyn & the EU, the Nazi’s next step: "Our aim was Europe a nation. Our
faith European Socialism" Mosley "My Life" autobiography 1957.
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On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 15:57:47 +0000, Brian Reay wrote:

I don't see how it can possibly be condensation. The opposite side you cannot see in this picture is as clean as a whistle yet it is as fully exposed to the elements as the pictured one is.
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On 17/07/2019 17:27, Jim GM4DHJ ... wrote:

Yup, or a lump of mortar is bridging the cavity somewhere just above where the damp is starting.
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On 17/07/2019 17:13, Dan Green wrote:

I agree. You have a leak a LONG way from where that is. Above the door or the window. Could be right up at eaves level
Assuming a cavity wall.
--
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On 17/07/2019 17:13, Dan Green wrote:

Moisture that side of the wall can evaporate. On the inside, warm air hits cold wall, and the moisture in the air condenses. Ventilation may be an issue too. The spores may have got into the plaster, and that part of the wall is locked in a cycle of mould.
Possibly. In the absence of another explanation it might be worth taking it back to brick and replacing the browning/plaster with something a bit more mould inhibiting, or if there's room, dry lining that portion of the internal wall.
--
Cheers, Rob

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On 17/07/2019 13:35, Dan Green wrote:

the original timber door had a vertical dpc which would have been nailed to the vertical section of the frame and built into the two leaves of the wall around the cavity closer.
When that UPVC door was fitted, the oik who removed the old wooden frame may have pulled out this dpc and now any water getting past the outer mastic seal is making the outer leaf of the wall (hidden by the frame) damp and this is tranferring into the inner leaf and causing the problem that is now apparent.
The only solution now is to make sure the mastic or low modulus sealant is effective and free from holes.
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On 17/07/2019 13:35, Dan Green wrote:

It cpould be condenastion. but my gues iss as follows, having had fairly similar issues.
Somewhere way up in yer cavity wall there is a leak, farily swmall - say 4mm diameter in some nastic etc..or an old TV aeial pulled out - and water is running down in the cavity until it gets to that window, or te door, which bridges the cavity ., stops it, and then its running off the edge and down inisde the cavity by the door frame and pooling at the bottom.
So look higher - much higher for where the leak is.
I used to get water dripping from my window frame tops onto the cills from rotten bargeboards a storey above.

--
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Josef Stalin
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Maybe already asked but is this a recent thing or has it been this way for a while? As someone already mentioned a few more clear images could help of both external and internal.
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On Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:35:26 UTC+1, Dan Green wrote:

Condensation is most probable, though there are other maybes. Why one side only? Probably differing insulation or bridging in the wall.
Solution? Dehumidifier.
NT
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On 17/07/2019 13:35, Dan Green wrote:

Frame drainage blocked so water finding it's way out via plastic welded mitre joint in corner, or tracking through a frame fixing screw or running along frame DPC until it gets to the corner? Combination of the above?
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