cracks in ceiling

Hi,
We have a few cracks in the upstairs ceilings and as we decorating a room at a time I would like to find something that can be used to fill the cracks and if flexible so it wont crack in future, the bedroom we doing at present needed the old paint scraping off and I've skimmed it with plaster but there are cracks along the joints of the boards, there may be some movement in the joists above but fixing that is way beyond me, so does any one know of a good flexible filler that works ? These are hairline cracks by the way.
TIA,
Mart.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
martop wrote:

Swap positions with your wife. Put her underneath :-)
When she moans, then you will know it will be time to re-work the ceilings.
Sorry, I couldn't resist.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

Stuff that, its easier on me to remove the light bulb or get her a blind fold ! However, I wonder if her pie pastry is the sort of thing I'm looking for ;-) -- Mart
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
martop wrote:

No filler will work.
put scrim tape over the joins and re plaster.
Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Thank, you confirmed my worst fears ! After considering different options I may as well go this route then its done for good.
Thank you :-)
-- Mart
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

You may not actually have to re-plaster. I have had reasonable success with a ceiling with a crack which had kept opening up. Yes, certainly you need scrim tape, but covering that with filler and feathering the edge over a reasonable distance should not be too noticeable. Use a taping knife similar to this:
<http://www.screwfix.com/prods/86869/Hand-Tools/Plastering-Tools/Edge-Jointing-Tools/Forge-Steel-Taping-Knife-10-254mm
although the one I have has a plastic blade.
Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
snipped-for-privacy@cdixon.me.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That won't stop cracks.
--
*Support bacteria - they're the only culture some people have *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

did here.
Only cracks are where there aint no tape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Loads here where there is.
--
*Do infants enjoy infancy as much as adults enjoy adultery?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

then you should sue whoever built the house
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The house was built with lath and lime plaster. Where ceilings have been replaced with plasterboard - scrim and skimmed - some of the joints have cracked. Raking them out and using decorator's caulk sorts them. No other filler I've tried does.
--
*Time is what keeps everything from happening at once.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 31 Mar 2010 10:30:11 +0100, The Natural Philosopher

Using flexible filler from a gun was successful in my case. Also, Polycell do several products that are said to be pliable, e.g. "Crack-Free Ceilings" I used their ripple coat once and never saw a crack again.
MM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Rake out and use decorator's caulk. Because it shrinks when drying you'll need to apply several coats. But will eventually give an invisible repair which lasts.
--
*When she saw her first strands of grey hair, she thought she'd dye*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wibbled on Wednesday 31 March 2010 09:09

And stop worrying so much. There will always be cracks, but if you play your cards right, they'll be hairline rather than major.
--
Tim Watts

Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That was kind of my first reaction when I read this. After all, the house is not going to fall down because of a few hairline cracks in the ceilings.
MM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

These are hairline cracks, right? A tub of ready-mixed "fine surface filler" might work. Quite different to standard filler IME.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
stuart noble wrote:

It doesn't because what is happening is that the strength of the plasterboard - the cardboard - is compromised where the sheets butt join: The only way to give a uniform stress concentration is to reinforced the join with - normally - scrim tape. You could use anything really - bits of cloth PVA'ed to the bare boards - but there will always be hairline cracks between boards due to small movements, differential expansion, wood movement etc unless you somehow carry the stresed skin across.
The problem is merely that the tensile strength of plaster skim is way less than that of cardboard.
As far as flexible fillers go, they need a distance over which to flex: Hairline cracks ain't it. They will crack just the same.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Likely only to work if flexible. Which most of these fillers ain't.
--
*I don't have a solution, but I admire your problem. *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Most are, to a degree, because they normally contain a pva or acrylic binder but, the more flexible they are, the less sandable. They should be able to withstand hairline fractures I would have thought
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've yet to find a sand able filler which doesn't crack, when used to fill a previous crack on things that move like ceilings under a suspended floor. But if you apply decorator's caulk properly, it doesn't need sanding.
--
*Why is the man who invests all your money called a broker? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.