Corrugated sheet shelter

I'd like to fix a piece of 2m x 1m corrugated onduline type sheet to a wall - act as something approaching shelter for my bike. It'd be into a corner, with the shorter end meeting the house wall, and the longer end onto a 6'/9" solid brick garden wall.
I'd prefer not to use a post, and have the 4th unsupported corner floating. Might this work, and any suggestions for a supporting frame?
--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RJH wrote:

    Triangular bracket.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Which will impact head in the dark.
Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Above the corrugated material so you don’t walk into it.
That’s how street awnings are done when you don’t want poles at the gutter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmm, well the problem with most corrugated materials is that wind catches them and tends to pull them off of the frame. I suppose ith enough overkill on support points it might work, but I'm still not sure it will last. Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Trivially easy to avoid that by having horizontal frame pieces both above and below the corrugated materials.

Corse it will work.

No reason why it can't last with say galvanised steel frame used above the corrugated materials, even just 25mm square steel tube would last fine.
With the same stuff under the corrugated materials, all welded together or bolted with stainless bolts if you can't weld and don’t have a welder.
Much harder to stop feet of snow bringing it all down tho.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/06/2017 05:13, Rod Speed wrote:

I had wondered about some sort of self-fabricacted frame - either wood or metal - at the unsupported corner. It can't go above, though, as the wall's only 61, and I'd like as much clearance as possible beneath.

In a sense, I'd rather it came down than put too much on to the solid wall.

--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd not use wood myself, but then I can weld and have what is needed to do that.
And sneered at what my mater did with a metal roof rack system for his landrover.

In that case I'd give up on doing without a post and use a metal one. Sure, not as convenient to use, but will survive almost anything.

Sure. And can even be designed to come down cleanly on a heavy snowfall without doing the bike any harm.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, 20 June 2017 17:48:26 UTC+1, RJH wrote:

It might, but once a tonne of snow sits on it it sure won't.
NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes

Not sure I can picture the set up.. could you extend a support up from the garden wall and then hang the triangular support suggested elsewhere from that?
--
Tim Lamb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/20/2017 9:28 PM, Tim Lamb wrote:

I don't have the picture either. You say it is into a corner but your description sounds as though it is between two walls. Do you mean that the solid brick garden wall is perpendicular to your house wall? Is that as high as you want the top end to be, or is the height of the garden wall the same as the planned height of the lower end of the "roof"?
Superficially, it sounds to me as though you might get away with an unsupported corner but the devil is in the detail. Is it sheltered from wind, will it see high snow loads? If the garden wall is higher than the top end, you can screw a rafter (the sloping piece of wood) firmly to this, and provide one very secure edge, together with a good edge on the house wall. If the garden wall is lower, you probably want a triangular frame (for stiffness) comprising the edge rafter, a horizontal piece of wood along the top of the garden wall, and a vertical piece on the house wall. You might panel this in with plywood for extra strength.
Another way to support the "unsupported corner" might be with a straining wire from that corner up to the house wall just below the guttering (the more "vertical" the better). This needs to be securely fixed to the wall. You can easily provide tensioning adjustment with a turnbuckle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20/06/2017 21:51, newshound wrote:

It would lean from the garden wall, with the 1m width supported by the house/garden wall at one end, and the garden wall and unsupported 9except by a frame etc) at the other.

Not sure what you mean by 'garden wall lower' - but that last sentence sums up what I'm after. I'd probably just bolt a piece of timber diagonally on the house wall, at the angle of the pitch. It's the unsupported corner I'm not sure about -

Yes, that would work, but I want to avoid anything that's visible from next door, partly because of the mess I'd likely make of it :-)
--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/21/2017 8:42 AM, RJH wrote:

Nope. Still don't understand.
Is the garden wall as high as the top part of the new "roof"?
Is the garden wall perpendicular to, and attached to, the house?
Do you want the drainage to be away from the house, or running parallel to the house?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/06/2017 09:14, newshound wrote:

It's basically a piece of sheet bolted on to the back of a 'normal' terraced house.

Yes, I'd attach the long end of the sheet to a piece of wood screwed near the top of the garden wall.

Yes

Parallel
--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/21/2017 9:55 AM, RJH wrote:

Thanks. As others have said, you will need to support the corrugated sheet by some sort of timber frame.
But I am still confused by your description. Normally, a 2 x 1 sheet would have the corrugations draining along the *long* direction.
I would build the frame for a sheet like that using treated timber, say two lengths of Wickes treated 38 x 89 as the "rafters" and then four or five lengths of 38 x 63 as the cross-members. I would build the frame on the ground, check that it fitted the space properly, then screw or nail the roofing in place, then put up the complete "roof", supporting it on separate timbers already fixed to the two walls.
I would still try to provide some extra support for the unsupported corner, if not a tension wire then a diagonal brace underneath the short edge. It need not go right to the corner, even half way would help. The more vertical the better, but if you need to angle it to provide access then the more angled, the stiffer and more securely fastened it needs to be.
But if your "long end" is along the garden wall, and the drainage direction of the sheet is parallel to the house wall, then this implies that you have a sheet draining along the short direction. I'm not quite sure how I would frame that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/06/2017 12:57, newshound wrote:

Ah yes you're right, my thinking hadn't got that far. It would need to slope down along its length, away from the house. Not as I'd said above. Mmmm - would look a bit odd. Maybe cut it in 2 and have the drain run parallel.

Thanks for that, appreciated.
--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1m doesn’t provide that much shelter. My eaves on the sunny side of the passive solar house are 2m so the sun comes in in winter and not in the summer and that doesn’t provide all that much shelter for something like a bike against the wall.
Better than nothing, but not great in a decent storm.

Yes it does and street awnings are all done like that now.
You do need to allow for feet of snow on it tho.

Something at the corner where you don’t want a post, attached to the wall above the frame for the corrugated material at the corner.
Anything from a triangular metal frame to just a steel rod in tension, tho the later is harder to easily attach to the wall securely and depends on the wall being much stronger.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/06/2017 06:07, Rod Speed wrote:

Yes, agreed - but it's the better than nothing I'm after in a 'garden' that isn't much more than a yard. The sheet was bought without much thought - I had a load of sheet materials being delivered anyway.

And to make matters worse, keep the pitch shallow to maximise the height (6' wall). I know this doesn't sound elegant, but I'd rather it 'crumpled' under snow than took the wall down. Also, it's quite probable that in the unlikely event of a foot or more of snow I could simply brush it off as it fell. Not exactly engineering in, I know . . .

Yep, good.

Yes, I'd be looking at the frame. Any suggestions on the best way forward there appreciated - either off the shelf supplier, or just lash something up out of timber.
--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

Yeah, that’s the way I'd do it myself, sort of hinged on the long side so it hinges against the wall and the bike in a heavy snow storm. Wouldn’t do the bike any harm when done properly and would protect it from the snow.
Just a minor bit of work in the unusual event of a heavy snow storm shovelling the snow away and hinging back the 'roof' to where it normally sits and putting the small breakaway retaining thing back again.

Personally I'd hinge it on the long side and then it will work auto even if you are away at the time etc.

Personally I'd weld it up out of 19mm rhs with that on both sides of the corrugated sheet so it handles strong wind fine.
Hinged along the long side so it auto folds down in a very heavy snow storm.

I much prefer metal RHS but I have what is needed to weld it and know how to weld stuff.
Both my gates are done like that and have lasted for more than 45 years fine.
Your 'roof' is just the same as my gates but normally sitting horizontally instead of vertically and clad with ouduline instead of the metal sheet one of my gates has. With hinges that are just a metal rod which is a cut off bolt welded to the gates, going thru a hole in a metal strap dynabolted to the block and brick walls.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Jun 2017 17:48:23 +0100, RJH wrote:

The maximum 'overhang' for these sheets is very small - around 100mm IIRC. Corruline would be less, I'd guess, as it's thinner than Onduline. Also, open, the wind might rip it apart.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.