Concealing the wiring for an electric inset fire

I'm probably going to fit one of those inset electric fires into an existing fireplace - basically just for decorative purposes as there is CH in the room.
Something like this: <http://tinyurl.com/2h4vus (or <http://www.diy.com/diy/jsp/bq/nav/skins/popups/gen_el_pop_from_gensku.jsp?PRODIDu20211&SKUIDu20211&CATID 30237&reftail&startIndex=1&referrer=%2Fbq%2Fnav%2Fnav.jsp%3Faction%3Ddetail%26fh_secondid%3D7520211%26fh_reftheme%3Dpromo_50931852%252cseeall%252c%252f%252fcatalog01%252fen_GB%252fcategories%253c%257b8530236%257d%252fcategories%253c%257b8530237%257d%26fh_sort_order%3D1%26fh_sort_by%3D_price_rrp_min%26fh_location%3D%252f%252fcatalog01%252fen_GB%252fcategories%253c%257b8530236%257d%252fcategories%253c%257b8530237%257d%252fspecificationsProductType%253e%257belectric_fires%257d%26fh_eds%3D%25c3%259f%26fh_refview%3Dlister%26ts%3D1169631766372&null&IsError=no>)
What is the normal way of providing power to these? They are usually supplied with a flex plus 13A plug emerging from the rear; and you really don't want to have a flex emerging from the side of the fire and trailing across the hearth to the nearest socket - and I'm sure that's not intended.
Now in the past when I've fitted these beasts I've solved this by drilling a long hole from the outside of the chimney breast into the fireplace; threading the flex down said hole; and connecting up to a socket on the side of the chimney breast. However, in the current case, the fireplace is actually on a totally flat wall, with the chimney breast in the adjacent room, which seems a bit unusual, and which makes concealing the flex awkward. So:
Option (1): I drill my hole as before, but this means the flex will pass through the chimney breast to connect to a socket in the adjacent room (still in my property, obviously!)
Option (2): I install a spurred socket on the firebrick *inside* the fireplace, behind the electric fire.
In either case, I could use an FCU instead if that would be better, but even so, both the above options seem a bit dodgy practice to me. Apart from other considerations, this will need to pass a future electrical inspection, so needs to be right! What do the experts think?
Thanks David
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On Wed, 24 Jan 2007 09:59:56 GMT someone who may be Lobster

Assuming it is on a ring main, or radial circuit, which also feeds the living room, drill through the wall from the adjacent room and fit a switched fused connection unit on the totally flat wall as a spur. This might be a suitably fancy metal one rather than a plastic one. Run a cable from this to a cord outlet inside the fireplace and connect the flex up to this. Ensure flex is not trapped when putting the fire back, ensure the temperature inside the fireplace does not rise above what the cable and accessories can cope with.
http://www.dealec.co.uk/acatalog/Deal_Electrical__Connection_Units_6.html has plastic examples of the two bits.
If you are short of sockets then for little extra effort a ring main could be extended into the living room, with extra sockets in the adjacent room and living room. These can also be installed simply as a way of getting cables into acceptable zones.
--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
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David Hansen wrote:

OK, that makes sense: a variation on Option (2) then. With the ring main I've just installed, there's no problem in principle cabling up that.
So, positioning a cable outlet inside the fireplace like this would definitely be regarded as "OK"?
David
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On Wed, 24 Jan 2007 17:19:29 GMT someone who may be Lobster

Few things are definite. If the surface inside the fireplace is suitable and if the temperature at the back of the fire is not too great then I would be happy to argue it is fine. In essence it is no different to a cooker connection unit.
An alternative would be to put some plastic conduit between the switched fused connection unit and the fireplace and thread the cable from the fire through that.
--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
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Dinnae install an inset electric fires into thy existing fireplace for decorative purposes. Dinnae dinnae dinnae.
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Anita Palley wrote:

Because because because....?
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