Cleaning washing machine door seal.

We have a Meile washing machine that works well. Unfortunately the door seal has developed mould, despite my wife drying it each use. Is there anything that will remove this horrible staining black mould without damaging the rubber(?) seal?
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Residing on low ground in North Staffordshire

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On 16/08/2012 13:38, Moonraker wrote:

I'll jump in first - angle grinder!
The dreaded black mould on rubber seems to be impervious even to proper chlorine bleach :-(
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On Thursday, August 16, 2012 1:57:22 PM UTC+1, Phil wrote:

Is this black mould the same black mould yuo get on damp walls, if it is maybe the ordinalry mould sprays will remove it, I had limited success on my fridge freeze door seal or maybe it was just the rubbing that removed it.
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On Thu, 16 Aug 2012 13:57:22 +0100, Phil

I was surprised at how effective Sainsbury's Basics Thin Bleach was at getting rid of black mould from the silicone seal around the bath. Wiping it on didn't do much good so I mashed a few yards of bog paper into something resembling a long section of dental wadding and packed it into the corners. I then trickled said bleach onto the wadding until it was saturated and left it to act for 24hrs.
It came up clean as new and hasn't succumbed to new black mould as easily as before, either.
I was willing to do this because, if it hadn't worked or if it had destroyed the seal, I'd have had to replace the silicone anyway. I'm sure the OP could do something similar with the door seal but I'd be worried that the bleach might shorten the life of the rubber.
Nick
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Machines often warn against use of chlorine bleach because it weakens GRP which is what the outer drums are often made of, and might result in a later catastrophic failure during fast spin (high stress).
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Andrew Gabriel
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If you close the door after every wash the mold will happen. A Hotpoint engineer told me that many years ago. Try plenty of Mr Muscle kitchen cleaner and one of those pan scrub things that is green on one side.
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Using a green scourer will introduce scratches in the surface wich will make it more likely to get mould. Never use them on surfaces that have a shiny surface.
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A green on one side plastic scourer will not damage rubber seals. Trust me; I know.
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On Thu, 16 Aug 2012 19:47:00 +0100, Mr Pounder wrote:

There seems to be a 'threshold', in that there will be no damage below a certain pressure, then the green scritcher will 'bite'. I've some "non-scratch" white ones (Wilko, IIRC) that might be better for this sort of application. Note: the idea of a "non-scratch" scourer seems a bit wierd.
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On Thu, 16 Aug 2012 14:01:05 +0100, Mr Pounder wrote:

Trouble is, I've seen conflicting advice on this: that the door should be shut to preserve the shape of the seal; that the door should be open to reduce the mold. I leave mine open and the seal is still functioning after 10 years.
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Peter.
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One obvious approach is to leave it open until the washing machine has dried out completely after the wash and then close it after that.
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how can one possibly see when its dry, the bits that stay wet longest are out of sight.
Mould is a problem, misshapen seals usually aren't
NT
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You don't have to see, just leave the door open long enough so that it will have dried out, then close it.

Yes.
But there is no harm in closing the door once its dried out so you don't get a misshapen seal.
Corse that approach may not be feasible if say you always do lots of washes per day because you have lots of ankle biters, but most don't.
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On 17/08/2012 11:48, NT wrote:

How much of a problem, really?
Ours has a fairly severe case, won't come off despite all efforts and other than periodically wiping it down to ensure there's nothing 'loose' that's going to come off onto clothes or fly round the room when dry, we just live with it. Many years later, we're still here, healthy, with unstained clothes, unsightly though it is.
What's people's major concernabout it - aspergillus infection? clothes staining? yuck factor? leaking?
Dvaid
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Me too. No mold.

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Have you tried a boil wash?
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In article

One with 1 cup white vinegar and 1 cup washing soda suggested.
Might be an idea to precede this with an attack with a good kitchen surface cleaner on kitchen towels, wiping well into the folds and flaps.
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fred
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fred wrote:

so that the effect of one is totally nagted by teh other?
Neat. You should tell the coalition.

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Moonraker wrote:

bleach ain't bad..it wont do the rubber any good, but it wont destroy in inside a week or ten either.
I've used that a lot to clear black mould.
Rinse well afterwards. wear glasses if you are clumsy.
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I find a boiling acid wash removes most crud overall. Citric or vinegar work fine.
NT
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