Cleaning Gutters


I assume that it is OK to extend the ladder such that it actually rests on the gutter? Or ideally should you use an extender at the top of the ladder to offset the ladder from the supporting wall?
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On 28/06/2014 06:45, Graham Bean wrote:

I know that this is a diy newsgroup but is it really worthwhile. I have windowcleaners once a month £8 (using a long reach de-ionised water system - no ladders) for a smallish detached house. They cleaned out the gutters using a long reach vacuum for £40 oncluding cleaning the windows afterwards. Worth thinking about?
Malcolm
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On 28/06/14 06:45, Graham Bean wrote:

Yes. Even uPVC gutter seems to cope. Metal certainly will.
Other materials (eg asbestos) (rare) may or may not.
However, I do not like resting ladders on uPVC because it slips sideways in a very scary way.
I would get one of those ladder stand-offs you can clamp to the latter - a good one makes everything so much more solid.
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On 28/06/2014 19:56, Tim Watts wrote:

+1, but my standoff doesn't even need clamps, it has U-shaped supports which slip over the rungs.
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Why do you need the ladders to rest on the gutters? Put the ladders up just below the gutters and you can stand on the ladders with your head and arms above the gutters to clear them out.
I managed to do this after a few beers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RwKX34KjBs

--
Adam


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On 29/06/2014 19:10, ARW wrote:

So much easier and safer with a stand-off
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Graham Bean wrote:

If the gutter is strong enough to take the weight of the ladder it's OK. Most all gutters are, except very old plastic ones that have been weakened by sunlight, and some asbestos ones.
The ladder may slip sideways, especially on plastic guttering. Use a clamp on the gutter to hold it. Wide jawed welding clamps (the top one here) http://www.tooled-up.com/product/sealey-c-clamp-welding-clamp-set-3pc/26153/?Referrer=googleproductlisting&gclid=CJCEqO6AoL8CFcbKtAodk3gAag
are very good, or you could use a little vice. Tie the ladder to it.
It is vitally important that the foot of the ladder does not slip, and that both legs are on firm, even ground.
Bill (45 years aerial installing and never a fall)
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On 29/06/2014 22:18, Bill Wright wrote:

You are dicing with death resting a ladder on any kind of guttering.

And if the ladder slips, those brittle plastic brackets, held in by 1" screws, are going to snap, or the clips will break.

The only sensible advice in the post.

I wonder how.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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On Sat, 28 Jun 2014 06:45:46 +0100, Graham Bean wrote:
Why do you need to clean out your gutters? Corectly installed (ie correct fall) they should self clean in the vast majority of situations.
--
Cheers
Dave.
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Because plenty of them do get clogged up.

Bullshit, most obviously with big trees close to the house.
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On 30/06/2014 01:09, Dave Liquorice wrote:

But they don't, thanks heavens. I clean out half a dozen a month at least, easy money.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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Here (Scotland) there's an amazing quantity of moss etc that seems to come off the roof into the gutters. I don't want that flow into downpipes, so there are guards across them, but they get blocked...
--
Jeremy C B Nicoll - my opinions are my own.

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On Mon, 30 Jun 2014 01:20:59 +0100, Jeremy Nicoll - news posts wrote:

Unless they are very convoluted it just end up in the gully and be a damn site easier to clean out than faffing about on ladders at gutter height. And how do you clean the gutters anyway without flushing some stuff down the down pipes anyway?

Well if the guards are getting blocked you may as well let the moss get into the gutter and be washed down to the gully for removal. That's if it just doesn't decompose in the gully and be washed through.
--
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Dave.
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There is no gully with my gutters.

Wrong when there is no gully.

I use a shovel while standing on the flat roof.
The gutters are over a foot wide and so are trivial to shovel out.

Not if there is no gully.

Doesn't happen with the leaves that end up in my gutters.
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What's a gully?
The pipes go straight down the wall and underground, to join the drains.

In the past I've used gloved hands, or a round section garden trowel to scoop gunk out of the gutters into a bucket. In some cases where there's not too much gunk I've used a round section blade on a cane (like a lightweight garden hoe) to drag stuff along gutters towards me so as not to have to set up the ladders at quite such frequent intervals. I don't usually flsuh the gutters with water, as the local climate can be relied on to do so quite soon enough.
--
Jeremy C B Nicoll - my opinions are my own.

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On 30/06/14 23:41, Jeremy Nicoll - news posts wrote:

A open drain at the bottom that the downpipe sits over.
I built 2 for my house because I hate new fangled sealed drains - you can't throw a bucket of water down them!

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Jeremy Nicoll - news posts wrote:

Yeah, now I have a box of nitrile gloves (from doing some foaming) I'll use those rather than end up with a soggy handful of decomposing chick that was blocking the leafguard that kept overflowing ...
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The Medway Handyman wrote:

You're pissing in the wind making out you know better than me on this topic. For years when I was doing contract rigging I was finding a safe way to get onto around 60 roofs a week. My advice might not be what the Elf and Safety insist on, but that's because it's based a massive amount of practical experience rather than book learning. How many roofs have you climbed onto in your career as a handyman? I reckon I did around 80,000.
Bill
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Bill Wright wrote:

But with that level of experience, you'd presumably spot a dodgy gutter a mile off? Whereas someone who only climbs a couple in their lifetime might not recognise it. Personally I always use a stand-off it feels so much safer, and I remember how *slowly* I took things when replacing my aerials, especially the transfer between the two ladders ...
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On 01/07/2014 03:24, Bill Wright wrote:

It's a matter of common bloody sense. Plastic gutters are not strong enough to support a grown man on a ladder. You also risk damaging the customers property.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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