Carpet fitting - felt backed

I have a 3m x 4m bedroom to carpet at a relatively low cost.
I'm looking at a "heavy domestic" quality felt backed carpet at around
£8 square metre (a better quality than the felt backed carpet the same
retailer sells for 2/3 of that price).
I'm aware that this type of carpet can be fitted without an underlay and
stuck down around the edges. However the floor in this room (1900
build) has gaps between the floor boards an is slightly uneven.
I'm NOt going to start taking up the boards to re-position them to
eliminate the gaps of up to 5mm wide.
I have a enough cloud 7 11mm underlay that has been lying around for the
past 2/3 years that I can use. I'm thinking of using this under the
carpet either stapled down or glued down.
Has anyone had any experience with this arrangement.
I'm assuming that the underlay is fitted to the wall (no border gap) and
the felt backed carpet glued at the edges to this. Traditional grippers
are not used with felt backed carpets.
Felt backed seems to be the modern equivalent of foam backed carpets.
Reply to
alan_m
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Yes I have three rooms with foam backed and am dreading the day it has to come up. Already there are hard mounds appearing suggesting its decomposed. I'd hope the felt they use now is not such a problem with age and does not end up as dust. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff
I don't think any underlay will deal with 5pp gaps.
If you don't want to hardboard the floor, fill the gaps with some form of wood filler.
I think the carpet will need to be tacked or stapled down to the floor, as glueing to the underlay means both layers of the sandwich will curl up.
But I'm not a carpet fitter.
Owain
Reply to
spuorgelgoog
In article ,
use old newspaper, dampend to fill the gaps. That's what was done by the previous owners of this house.
Reply to
charles
Yes, I carpeted two bedrooms with cheap felt-backed carpet about 10 years ago. I too used cloud underlay (cloud 9 in my case) which I stapled to the floor. I stapled lining paper to the floorboards first, under that.
I did use gripperrods all round the edge of the room, which worked fine with the felt-backed carpet.
The finished job looked and felt great - quite sumptuous, especially given the negligible cost of the carpet :)
Reply to
David
Felt backed is indeed the modern day rubber backed, designed to not need un derlay. The usual solution to gaps is to line the floor with 3mm hardboard.
If you do use underlay, the best way is to fit grip rods. The underlay sits within the grippers, it doesn't go to the wall. There is then no advantage to the felt backing, you can just as well use unpadded carpet.
You can economise by using old carpet as underlay. It voids guarantees but I've not run into any problem doing this. Just ensure it's cleaned & doesn' t whiff.
Glue or tacks instead of grip rods does work, but not as well and isn't wor th the trivial saving. And tacks can hit pipes.
NT
Reply to
tabbypurr
The normal practice is to nail down thin ply or hardboard on the floorboard s first.
Reply to
harry
I have used Cloud 9 under felt back. Grippers work ok, although the ones with the slightly longer nails sometimes work better.
Reply to
John Rumm
The last carpet left from when we bought this house in for the chop shortly.
It's got moths in it.
(Apparently they like dirty one better than clean...)
Andy
Reply to
Vir Campestris
Further reading:
Without an underlay just glue down around the edges
With underlay use gripper rods BUT not the kind with spikes but the kind that have a microplast tape which have tiny mushrooms or discs and act similar to velcro on the felt backing.
There are also microplast plus spike gripper rods for fitting felt carpet to stairs however in the retailer I visited the description for each of the felt backed carpets had a line that said that they didn't recommend this type of carpet for stairs.
Reply to
alan_m

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